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Florida   Florida Profile

State Profile and Energy Estimates

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(overview, data, & analysis)

Last Updated: December 16, 2021

Overview

Florida is the third-largest energy consumer among the states, but its per capita energy consumption is fourth-lowest.

The Florida peninsula extends almost 450 miles south from the Georgia border to the Florida Keys in the Gulf of Mexico and includes the southernmost point in the continental United States.1 The state's northern boundary stretches about 360 miles from the Atlantic Ocean across the Florida Panhandle to the Perdido River, the state's western boundary with Alabama.2 Known as the Sunshine State, Florida has significant solar energy potential as well as substantial biomass resources and small amounts of oil and natural gas production.3,4,5,6 The warm waters of the Gulf Stream wrap around much of the state's marine coastline and moderate Florida's climate, which ranges from tropical to subtropical.7,8 The Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean make the state one of the most humid in the nation, with frequent summer thunderstorms and occasional devastating hurricanes. As a result, Florida has taken more direct hits from tropical storms and hurricanes than any other state in the nation.9,10

Until the 20th century, Florida was largely rural and sparsely populated, but it has been one of the fastest growing states during the past century, in part because air conditioning became widely available and because of the state's popularity as a tourist and retirement destination.11,12 Florida is the third-most populous state and the third-largest energy-consuming state in the nation.13,14 However, Florida ranks fourth-lowest in per capita energy consumption, in part because of its large population, moderate winter weather, and relatively low industrial sector energy use.15,16 The transportation sector, which includes the energy used by the automobiles, trains, planes, and ships that bring the many tourists who visit Florida's beaches and attractions, leads end-use energy consumption, and it accounted for about two-fifths of the state's total energy use in 2019. The residential sector, where almost all homes use air conditioning, accounted for more than one-fourth of state energy consumption.17,18 Florida's commercial sector accounted for more than one-fifth of state energy use and the industrial sector accounted for slightly more than one-tenth.19 Overall, Florida consumes almost eight times more energy than it produces.20

Electricity

Florida is the second-largest producer of electricity in the nation.

Florida is the second-largest producer of electricity in the nation, after Texas.21 In 2020, natural gas fueled three-fourths of Florida's in-state net generation, and 8 of the state's 10 largest power plants by capacity and by generation are natural gas-fired.22,23 Natural gas has fueled the largest share of Florida's electricity generation since 2003, when it surpassed coal's contribution for the first time.24 Florida also leads the nation in generators that can switch between natural gas and fuel oil.25 Although petroleum-fired power plants provided less than 0.1% of Florida's generation in 2020, petroleum liquids remain an important backup fuel source at many of the state's natural gas-fired power plants.26 In 2020, almost two-thirds of the state's natural gas-fired power plants could switch to petroleum fuels in the event of disruptions in the natural gas supply.27,28

The second-largest source of in-state generation in Florida is nuclear power. The state's two nuclear power stations are located on Florida's Atlantic Coast. Those two plants typically provide more than one-tenth of the state's net generation.29,30,31 Two proposed additional nuclear reactors received licenses, but plans to construct those reactors are on hold because of increased construction costs and competition from other fuels.32 Coal-fired power plants supplied about 7% of Florida's net generation in 2020, down from 36% in 2001. Renewable resources, mainly solar energy and biomass, plus petroleum coke and generation at industrial plants that use multiple fuels, accounted for almost all the remaining net generation in Florida.33 Almost all the state's recent and planned additions of generating capacity are natural gas-fueled or solar powered.34

Florida is the third-largest electricity consumer in the nation, after Texas and California.35 However, the state does not produce enough electricity to meet its power needs, and electricity demand is expected to increase as the state's population continues to grow.36,37,38 The residential sector, where more than 9 in 10 Florida households use electricity as their primary energy source for home heating and air conditioning, consumes more than half of the electricity used in Florida, the largest share of any state.39,40 The commercial sector accounts for about two-fifths of state consumption, and the industrial sector uses most of the rest. The transportation sector uses a very small amount of electricity.41 However, Florida is second only to California in the number of registered electric vehicles, and there are more than 2,300 public-access electric vehicle charging stations in the state.42,43

Renewable energy

Solar energy and biomass provide almost all of Florida’s renewable-sourced electricity generation.

Renewable resources fueled about 5% of Florida's in-state electricity net generation in 2020, and almost two-thirds of the state's renewable generation came from solar energy.44 In 2020, Florida surpassed Arizona to become fourth in the nation, after California, Texas, and North Carolina, in total solar power generating capacity.45 About 85% of the state's solar generation is at utility-scale (1 megawatt or larger) facilities.46 However, generation from small-scale installations (less than 1 megawatt) almost tripled between 2018 and 2020, in part because of the removal of state restrictions on leased solar systems.47,48 Florida is one of only four states with utility-scale electricity generation from solar thermal technologies, which concentrate sunlight to produce the high temperatures needed to power the turbines used to generate electricity.49,50 The Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center in Martin County, Florida, contains both a hybrid solar thermal and a natural gas-fueled facility. The Martin plant has a 75-megawatt concentrating solar power facility, with almost 200,000 mirrors, and a 1,100-megawatt natural gas-fired power plant. It is the only concentrating solar thermal generating facility east of the Rocky Mountains.51,52

Florida accounts for about 7% of the nation's biomass-fueled electricity generation, more than all but two other states, Georgia and California, and biomass fuels almost all of the non-solar renewable generation in Florida.53,54 The largest share of the state's almost 1,200 megawatts of biomass-fueled generating capacity is at plants that process municipal solid waste, followed by those fueled by wood and wood waste. Although there are many landfill gas facilities in Florida, they account for only 6% of the state's biomass generating capacity.55 Florida also has a variety of other biomass resources that are burned at utility-scale electricity generating facilities throughout the state. Those resources include sugarcane waste (bagasse), citrus pulp, forest residues, invasive trees and plants, animal waste, other agricultural residues, and yard waste.56 The state's biomass resources also provide feedstock for a wood pellet manufacturing plant located in the state's Panhandle. That plant has a production capacity of about 827,000 tons per year.57

Florida has few other renewable energy assets. Two hydroelectric plants in north Florida supply a small amount of power.58 However, the state's flat terrain gives Florida little opportunity for hydropower development.59 The state has no significant wind resources, onshore or offshore, and there is no utility-scale wind-powered generating capacity.60,61,62

Florida does not have a renewable energy portfolio standard, but it does have state and local incentives, tax credits, and loan programs for certain renewable energy technologies.63,64 The state has adopted net metering and interconnection rules for qualifying customer-sited renewable energy generating facilities.65,66 Florida utilities also have individual energy efficiency goals set by the Florida Public Service Commission.67

Petroleum

Florida has minor crude oil reserves and accounts for less than 0.1% of the nation's crude oil production.68,69 Onshore drilling for oil and gas in Florida began in 1901 and about 80 exploration wells were drilled in the state before oil was discovered in southwest Florida in 1943.70 Annual crude oil production in the state peaked at more than 47 million barrels in 1978 with the development of the Jay Field in the Panhandle in northwestern Florida. Since 1978, statewide production has declined and has been less than 2 million barrels in each year since 2008. In 2020, Florida crude oil production was less than 1.5 million barrels.71,72 Geologists believe there may be substantial additional reserves in federal waters off Florida's western coast in the Gulf of Mexico.73 However, since 1989, Florida has banned drilling in both Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico state waters. In 2006, Congress banned oil and gas leasing in federal offshore areas in the central Gulf of Mexico planning area within 100 miles of Florida's coastline and in most of the eastern Gulf of Mexico planning area within 125 miles of Florida's coast. The ban on federal oil and gas leases off of the state's Gulf coast was to expire in 2022, but a Presidential Memorandum signed in 2020 extends the ban for another 10 years and includes federal areas off Florida's Atlantic coast.74,75,76

Florida does not have any crude oil refineries or interstate crude oil or petroleum product pipelines.77,78 The state relies on petroleum products delivered to Florida's inland petroleum product terminals by rail, truck, tanker, and barge, and on deliveries to marine terminals located at several ports in the state.79 Petroleum products, including residual fuel oil, jet fuel, motor gasoline, low-sulfur distillate, and asphalt, arrive in Florida ports from around the world.80 An intrastate pipeline transports petroleum products—including motor gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel—as well as fuel ethanol from the Tampa Bay port area across central Florida to Orlando.81

Tourism and traffic through busy international airports drive petroleum consumption in Florida’s transportation sector.

More than nine-tenths of Florida's petroleum consumption occurs in the transportation sector.82 In part because of Florida's significant tourist industry and the heavy passenger and cargo traffic through its international airports, the state is among the top five petroleum-consuming states in the nation.83,84 In 2020, Florida ranked third in the nation in jet fuel consumption, and, in 2019, the state ranked third in total motor gasoline consumption as well.85,86 Even so, in part because of its large population, Florida is among the 10 states that use the least petroleum on a per capita basis.87 Florida does not require motor gasoline that is blended with ethanol, and federal requirements for cleaner-burning summer gasoline blends in the state's urban areas were lifted in 2014.88,89 However, motor gasoline blended with ethanol is widely used, and Florida is the third-largest consumer of fuel ethanol in the nation. There are no fuel ethanol production plants in the state.90,91 Florida biodiesel consumption ranks among the top two-fifths of states, but the state's last biodiesel production plant closed and the equipment was put up for sale in 2021.92,93,94

The industrial and commercial sectors account for almost all of the rest of the petroleum consumed in Florida. Because electric utilities have retired older petroleum-fired units and replaced many of them with natural gas-fired ones, the electric power sector now uses less than 1% of the petroleum consumed in the state. However, Florida is third in the nation, after Hawaii and Louisiana, in petroleum use for power generation. The residential sector, where fewer than 1 in 100 households use petroleum products, mostly propane, for heating, consumes even less.95,96

Natural gas

Florida does not have significant natural gas reserves, but the state does have a small amount of natural gas production, all from the same fields that produce crude oil.97 Almost all of the state's natural gas production is in the Jay Field in the Florida Panhandle, where most of the natural gas produced is reinjected into the oil zones to maintain reservoir pressures and improve oil production.98 As a result, only between about 5% and 15% of the state's natural gas gross withdrawals are marketed.99 Florida's annual natural gas production peaked at almost 52 billion cubic feet in 1978, less than 0.3% of the U.S. total that year, but declined steadily in the next three decades. Production rose to more than one-third of the state's earlier peak in 2012, but declined again and was only slightly more than one-tenth of the 1978 amount in 2020.100 Economically recoverable natural gas reserves may lie offshore in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, but, as with crude oil, exploratory drilling in state and federal waters in the eastern Gulf is not allowed.101,102

Florida receives nearly all the natural gas it consumes from the Gulf Coast region via major interstate pipelines. Pipelines entering Florida bring natural gas into the state through Alabama and Georgia.103,104,105 One subsea pipeline runs 745 miles across the Gulf of Mexico, forming an offshore link from the Mississippi and Alabama border to central Florida.106,107 The electric power sector receives most of the natural gas delivered to Florida consumers. In 2020, electricity generation accounted for 87% of the state's total natural gas use. The industrial sector used about 8% of state deliveries, and the commercial sector accounted for about 4%. The residential sector, where fewer than 1 in 20 households use natural gas as a primary home heating fuel, used only about 1%. A very small amount is consumed as vehicle fuel.108,109 There are fewer than 30 public-access compressed natural gas vehicle fueling stations in Florida.110

Coal

Florida does not have any coal reserves or production and relies on coal from several other states and from overseas to meet its limited coal demand.111,112 Domestic coal supplies for Florida's coal-fired electricity generating plants came by railroad and barge from Illinois, Kentucky, and Indiana in 2020. Other Florida industries received a small amount of domestic coal from Kentucky, Alabama, and Illinois.113 Port Tampa Bay, the largest cargo port in Florida, received a small amount of imported coal in 2019, but none in 2020.114,115 Almost all coal consumed in Florida is used for electricity generation.116 However, coal-fired electricity generation in the state has declined as older coal-fired units retired and were replaced by natural gas-fired generation.117,118 Coal consumption in Florida's electric power sector fell from 29 million tons in 2008 to less than 7 million tons in 2020.119

Endnotes

1 Atlas Obscura, Southernmost Point of the Continental U.S., accessed November 18, 2021.
2 State of Florida, Florida Quick Facts, Florida Geography, accessed November 18, 2021.
3 Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Office of Energy, 2020 Office of Energy Annual Report, p. 5.
4 Florida Energy Systems Consortium, Florida Energy Facts, Biomass Energy, accessed November 18, 2021.
5 U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Florida Field Production of Crude Oil, Annual, 1981-2020.
6 U.S. EIA, Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals, Annual, 1971-2020.
7 Zimmerman, Kim Ann, "What is the Gulf Stream?" Live Science (January 15, 2013).
8 Norrell, Robert J., Florida, Climate, Britannica, updated November 5, 2021.
9 Griffin, Melissa, "Florida...The ‘Liquid' Sunshine State," The CoCoRaHS ‘State Climates' Series, accessed November 18, 2021.
10 Donegan, Brian, "North Carolina Second Only to Florida for U.S. Tropical Storms and Hurricanes," Weather Underground (September 11, 2018).
11 Hobbes, Frank, and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, U.S. Census Bureau, CENSR-4 (November 2002), p. 7, 22, 26.
12 Briney, Amanda, "The Sunbelt, The Sunbelt of the Southern and Western United States," ThoughtCo., updated August 7, 2019.
13 U.S. Census Bureau, State Population Totals: 2010-2020, Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for the United States, Regions, States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2020; April 1, 2020; and July 1, 2020 (NST-EST2020).
14 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table C11, Energy Consumption Estimates by End Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2019.
15 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table C14, Total Energy Consumption Estimates per Capita by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2019.
16 Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Office of Energy, 2020 Office of Energy Annual Report, p. 1.
17 U.S. EIA, Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), 2015 RECS Survey Data, Table HC7.8, Air conditioning in homes in the South and West regions, South Atlantic.
18 U.S. EIA, Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), 2009 RECS Survey Data, Table HC7.10, Air conditioning in South Region, divisions, and states.
19 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table C1, Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2019.
20 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table P3, Total Primary Energy Production and Total Energy Consumption Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2019.
21 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Annual 2020 (October 2021), Table 3.7, Utility Scale Facility Net Generation.
22 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors, Florida, Fuel Type (Check all), Annual, 2001-20.
23 U.S. EIA, Florida Electricity Profile 2020, Table 2A, Ten largest plants by capacity, 2020, and Table 2B, Ten largest plants by generation, 2020.
24 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors, Florida, Fuel Type (Check all), Annual, 2001-20.
25 U.S. EIA, "About 13% of U.S. electricity generating capacity can switch between natural gas and oil," Today in Energy (February 11, 2020).
26 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors, Florida, Fuel Type (Check all), Annual, 2001-20.
27 U.S. EIA, Electricity, Form EIA-860 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-860A/860B), 2020 Form EIA-860 Data, Schedule 3, 'Generator Data' (Operable Units Only) and 2020 Form EIA-860 Data, Schedule 3, 'Fuel Switching Data' (Operable Units Only).
28 U.S. Department of Energy, State of Florida Energy Sector Risk Profile, accessed November 18, 2021, p. 7.
29 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Florida, updated March 19, 2020.
30 U.S. EIA, Florida Profile Overview, Nuclear Power Plant Map Layer, accessed November 19, 2021.
31 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors, Florida, All fuels, Nuclear, Annual, 2001-20.
32 Walton, Robert, "Nuclear regulators to license two new reactors at Turkey Point facility," Utility Dive (April 9, 2018).
33 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors, Florida, Fuel Type (Check all), Annual, 2001-20.
34 U.S. EIA, Electricity, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory (based on Form EIA-860M as a supplement to Form EIA-860), Inventory of Operating Generators as of August 2021, and Inventory of Planned Generators as of August 2021.
35 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table C17, Electricity Retail Sales, Total and Residential, Total and per Capita, Ranked by State, 2019.
36 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Annual 2020 (October 2021), Table 3.7, Utility Scale Facility Net Generation.
37 Florida Public Service Commission, Statistics of the Florida Electric Utility Industry (October 2021), Table 17, Projected Summer and Winter Peak Demand (Megawatts)2020-2029, p. 29.
38 Florida Department of Transportation, Forecasting and Trends Office, Projections of Florida Population by County, 2020-2070 (October 2020).
39 U.S. Census Bureau, Florida, Table B25040, House Heating Fuel, 2019 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates.
40 U.S. EIA, Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), 2009 RECS Survey Data, Air Conditioning, Table HC7.10.
41 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table F20, Electricity Consumption Estimates, 2019.
42 U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Alternative Fuels Data Center, Maps and Data, Electric Vehicle Registrations by State, updated June 2021.
43 U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Alternative Fuels Data Center, Alternative Fueling Station Locator, Florida, Electric, Access: Public, Available, accessed November 19, 2021.
44 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors, Florida, Fuel Type (Check all), 2001-20.
45 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Annual, Table 4.7.B, Net Summer Capacity Using Primarily Renewable Energy Sources and by State, 2020 and 2019.
46 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Annual, Table 3.21, Net Generation from Solar Photovoltaic by State, by Sector, 2020 and 2019.
47 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors, Florida, Fuel Type (Check all), 2001-20.
48 U.S. EIA, "Texas and Florida had large small-scale solar capacity increases in 2020," Today in Energy (March 4, 2021).
49 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Annual, Table 3.22, Utility Scale Facility Net Generation from Solar Thermal by State, by Sector, 2020 and 2019.
50 U.S. EIA, Solar Explained, Solar Thermal Power Plants, updated February 17, 2021.
51 Neville, Angela, "Top Plant: Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center, Indiantown, Martin County, Florida," Power (December 1, 2011).
52 National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power Projects, Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center, updated July 7, 2021.
53 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Annual, Table 3.19, Utility Scale Facility Net Generation from Biomass by State, by Sector, 2020 and 2019.
54 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors, Florida, Fuel Type (Check all), 2001-20.
55 U.S. EIA, Electricity, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory (based on Form EIA-860M as a supplement to Form EIA-860), Inventory of Operating Generators as of August 2021.
56 Florida Energy Systems Consortium, Biomass Energy, accessed November 20, 2021.
57 U.S. EIA, Monthly Densified Biomass Fuel Report, Table 1, Densified biomass fuel manufacturing facilities in the United States by state, region, and capacity, August 2021.
58 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, List of plants for conventional hydroelectric, Florida, all sectors, 2020.
59 NETSTATE, Florida, The Geography of Florida, updated September 9, 2017.
60 U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, WINDExchange, Florida 80-Meter Wind Resource Map, accessed November 20, 2021.
61 U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, WINDExchange, U.S. Offshore 90-Meter Wind Resource Potential, accessed November 20, 2021.
62 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors, Florida, Fuel Type (Check all), 2020.
63 National Conference of State Legislators, State Renewable Portfolio Standards and Goals, updated August 13, 2021.
64 NC Clean Energy Technology Center, DSIRE, Programs, Florida, Financial Incentives, accessed November 20, 2021.
65 NC Clean Energy Technology Center, DSIRE, Florida, Net Metering, updated September 21, 2021.
66 NC Clean Energy Technology Center, DSIRE, Florida, Interconnection Standards, updated July 23, 2020.
67 NC Clean Energy Technology Center, DSIRE, Florida, Energy Efficiency Goals, updated November 11, 2015.
68 U.S. EIA, Crude Oil Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production, Proved Reserves, as of December 31, 2014-19.
69 U.S. EIA, Crude Oil Production, Annual, 2015-20.
70 Wells, B.A. and K.L. Wells, "First Florida Oil Well," American Oil & Gas Historical Society, updated September 20, 2021.
71 Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Water Resource Management, Oil and Gas Program, Field Production Data_Graph, 2020, updated March 12, 2021, Excel File.
72 U.S. EIA, Florida Field Production of Crude Oil, Annual, 1981-2020.
73 U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, 2016a National Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf, Table 13, Risk mean-level UERR for the Gulf of Mexico OCS Region by planning area, p. 63.
74 Online Sunshine, The 2021 Florida Statutes, Title XXVIII, 377.242, accessed November 21, 2021.
75 U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Areas Under Restriction, accessed November 21, 2021.
76 U.S. Department of the Interior, "ICYMI: No Offshore Drilling around Florida and the Southern Atlantic," Press Release (September 10, 2020).
77 U.S. EIA, Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries, Total Number of Operable Refineries, 2016-21.
78 U.S. EIA, Florida Profile Overview, Crude Oil Pipeline Map Layer, accessed November 21, 2021.
79 U.S. EIA, Florida Profile Overview, Petroleum Product Terminal and Petroleum Port Map Layers, accessed November 21, 2021.
80 U.S. EIA, Petroleum and Other Liquids, Company Level Imports, Florida, accessed November 21, 2021.
81 Kinder Morgan, Products Pipelines, Central Florida Pipeline Company, accessed November 21, 2021.
82 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table F16, Total Petroleum Consumption Estimates, 2019.
83 Airports Council International, North American Airport Traffic Report, link to Top 50 2020 North American Traffic Report.
84 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table C15, Petroleum Consumption, Total and per Capita, Ranked by State, 2019.
85 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table F1, Jet Fuel Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2020.
86 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table F3, Motor Gasoline Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2019.
87 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table F16, Total Petroleum Consumption Estimates, 2019.
88 American Petroleum Institute, U.S. Gasoline Requirements (January 2018).
89 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Gasoline Standards, Relaxation of Summer Gasoline Volatility Standard for Florida and the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill Area (Triangle Area) and the Greensboro/Winston-Salem/High Point Area (Triad Area) in North Carolina, accessed November 21, 2021.
90 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table F25, Fuel ethanol consumption estimates, 2019.
91 U.S. EIA, U.S. Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity, U.S. fuel ethanol plant count by state, 2021.
92 U.S. EIA, U.S. Biodiesel Plant Production Capacity, U.S. biodiesel plant count by state, 2021.
93 Kotrba, Ron, "Miami-based Green Biofuels biodiesel plant equipment up for auction," Biobased Diesel Daily (November 4, 2021).
94 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table F26, Biodiesel Consumption Estimates, 2019.
95 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table F16, Total Petroleum Consumption Estimates, 2019.
96 U.S. Census Bureau, Florida, Table B25040, House Heating Fuel, 2019 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates.
97 U.S. EIA, Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of December 31, Florida, Annual, 2014-19.
98 Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Water Resource Management, Oil and Gas Program, State Production Data, Florida Production Data 2000 to 2021, updated November 3, 2021, Excel File.
99 U.S. EIA, Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production, Florida, Annual-Million Cubic Feet, 2015-20.
100 U.S. EIA, Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals, 1971-2020.
101 U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, 2016a National Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS Report BOEM 2017-085), Table 13, Risk mean-level UERR for the Gulf of Mexico OCS Region by planning area, p. 63.
102 Online Sunshine, The 2021 Florida Statutes, Title XXVIII, 377.242, accessed November 19, 2021.
103 U.S. EIA, International and Interstate Movements of Natural Gas by State, Florida, Annual, 2015-20.
104 "Sabal Trail Pipeline Begins Service," Gas Compression Magazine (July 13, 2017).
105 Energy Transfer, Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC, accessed November 19, 2021.
106 Gulfstream Natural Gas System, About Gulfstream, accessed November 19, 2021.
107 Enbridge, Natural gas transmission and midstream, U.S. Transmission, Gulfstream, accessed November 19, 2021.
108 U.S. EIA, Natural Gas Consumption by End Use, Florida, Annual, 2015-20.
109 U.S. Census Bureau, Florida, Table B25040, House Heating Fuel, 2019 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates.
110 U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Alternative Fuels Data Center, Alternative Fueling Station Locator, Florida, Natural gas, Access: Public, Available, accessed November 19, 2021.
111 U.S. EIA, Annual Coal Report 2020 (October 4, 2021), Table 15, Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve Base by Mining Method, 2020.
112 U.S. EIA, Annual Coal Report 2020 (October 4, 2021), Table 1, Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Mine Type, 2020 and 2019.
113 U.S. EIA, Annual Coal Distribution Report 2020 (October 4, 2021), By Coal Distribution State, Florida, Table DS-7, Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination State, 2020.
114 U.S. EIA, Quarterly Coal Report, October-December 2020 (April 2021), Table 20, Coal Imports by Customs District.
115 Port Tampa Bay, Cargo and Bulk Cargo, accessed November 19, 2021.
116 U.S. EIA Annual Coal Report 2020 (October 4, 2021), Table 26, U.S. Coal Consumption by End Use Sector, Census Division, and State, 2020 and 2019.
117 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors, Florida, All fuels, Coal, Natural gas, 2001-20.
118 U.S. EIA, "Natural gas-fired power generation has grown in Florida, displacing coal," Today in Energy (September 9, 2019).
119 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Receipts of fossil fuels by electricity plants for all sectors, Florida, Coal, 2008-20.