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Feb 20, 2018

U.S. ethane consumption, exports to increase as new petrochemical plants come online

monthly U.S. ethane production, consumption, and exports, as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2017

Over the next two years, EIA’s Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) projects growth in U.S. consumption of ethane in the petrochemical industry will exceed increases in consumption of all other petroleum and liquid products—such as motor gasoline, distillate, and jet fuel—combined. EIA also projects that ethane exports will continue increasing, as ethane is exported both by pipeline to Canada and by tankers to more distant destinations.

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Feb 16, 2018

U.S. coal production, exports, and prices increased in 2017

U.S. coal production and weekly spot steam prices, as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Coal Data Browser, Short-Term Energy Outlook, and Coal Markets

EIA expects total 2017 U.S. coal production to be 773 million short tons (MMst), 45 MMst higher than in 2016 and the largest year-over-year tonnage increase since 2001. Coal prices across the United States rose as well, especially for Central Appalachian coal. An increase in demand for U.S. coal exports more than offset a slight decline in U.S. coal consumption, contributing to higher coal production in 2017.

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Feb 15, 2018

U.S. proved reserves of natural gas up in 2016, oil reserves remained unchanged

U.S. natural gas, crude oil, and lease condensate proved reserves, as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves

The United States had 341.1 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of natural gas proved reserves as of the end of 2016, an increase of 5% from 2015, according to EIA’s recently released U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves report. U.S. crude oil and lease condensate proved reserves remained virtually unchanged from their 2015 level, at 35.2 billion barrels.

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Feb 14, 2018

U.S. imports of solar photovoltaic modules mainly come from Asia

U.S. photovoltaic module imports, as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63B, Annual Photovoltaic Cell/Module Shipments

Updated February 14, 2018, at 2:30 p.m. to correct the date of the tariff approval.

Solar photovoltaic (PV) module imports into the United States have increased significantly in recent years and represent a sizable portion of installed solar capacity. In 2016, U.S. imports of solar modules measured in direct current (DC) totaled 13 gigawatts (GWDC)—up from 2 GWDC in 2010—with two-thirds of 2016 imports coming from Malaysia, China, and South Korea.

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Feb 13, 2018

Electricity prices are highest in Hawaii but expenditures are highest in South Carolina

average residential electricity price and expenditures, as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, State Energy Data System and Electric Power Annual

Hawaii has the highest residential electricity prices in the United States, averaging 27.5 cents per kilowatthour (kWh) in 2016—more than twice the national average. However, residential customers in four states spent more per household for electricity that year: South Carolina, Alabama, Connecticut, and Maryland. In South Carolina, the average residential electricity customer spent $1,753 for electricity in 2016, about $400 more than the U.S. average and almost twice as much as the average customer in New Mexico.

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Feb 12, 2018

The United States is projected to become a net energy exporter in most AEO2018 cases

U.S. net energy trade, as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2018

EIA projects that the United States will become a net energy exporter in 2022 in the newly released Annual Energy Outlook 2018 (AEO2018) Reference case, primarily driven by changes in petroleum and natural gas markets. The transition from net energy importer to net energy exporter occurs even earlier in some sensitivity cases that modify assumptions about oil prices or resource extraction. Sensitivity cases with less energy production project that the United States will remain a net energy importer through 2050.

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Feb 9, 2018

Utilities continue to increase spending on transmission infrastructure

investment in transmission infrastructure by major utilities, as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Financial Reports, as accessed by Ventyx Velocity Suite
Note: RTOs are regional transmission organizations.

Spending on infrastructure to deliver power to homes and businesses has increased steadily over the past 10 years as utilities build, upgrade, and replace station equipment, poles, fixtures, and overhead lines and devices. Based on information compiled from utility reports to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC)—filed by utilities representing about 70% of total U.S. electric load—those utilities spent about $21 billion on capital additions in 2016. The Edison Electric Institute (EEI) estimates that utility spending on transmission infrastructure continued to increase in 2017.

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Feb 8, 2018

U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions expected to rise slightly in 2018, remain flat in 2019

U.S. energy-related co2 emissions, as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review, Short-Term Energy Outlook

EIA estimates that U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions declined by 861 million metric tons (14%) from 2005 to 2017. In the latest Short-Term Energy Outlook, EIA projects that CO2 emissions will rise 1.8%, from 5,143 million metric tons in 2017 to 5,237 million metric tons in 2018, then remain virtually unchanged in 2019. In 2019, energy-related CO2 emissions will be about 13% lower than 2005 levels.

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Feb 7, 2018

Future U.S. electricity generation mix will depend largely on natural gas prices

natural gas price to electric generators and electric generation share, as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2018

The mix of fuels used to generate electricity in the United States has changed in response to differences in the relative costs of electricity-generating technologies and, for those technologies that consume fuel, the cost of fuel. Several cases in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2018 (AEO2018) show how projected generation and capacity could continue to be affected by fuel price patterns, particularly for the price of natural gas. In a sensitivity case with low natural gas prices, natural gas ultimately provides more than half of all U.S. electricity generation by the mid-2040s.

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Feb 6, 2018

EIA’s latest Annual Energy Outlook projects rising production, relatively flat consumption

U.S. energy production and consumption, as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2018

EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2018 (AEO2018), released this morning, includes projections of U.S. energy markets through 2050 based on a Reference case and a number of sensitivity cases. The AEO2018 Reference case shows continued development of U.S. shale and tight oil and natural gas resources paired with modest energy consumption growth, leading to the transition of the United States from a net energy importer to a net energy exporter.

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