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New Mexico   New Mexico Profile

State Profile and Energy Estimates

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Profile AnalysisPrint State Energy Profile
(overview, data, & analysis)



Last Updated: April 21, 2022

Overview

New Mexico is home to the forested peaks and valleys of the southern Rocky Mountains, high plateaus of the Great Plains, and spectacular desert canyons and mesas.1,2 In addition to its dramatic vistas, the state has a wealth of fossil fuel, mineral, and renewable energy resources, including strong winds and abundant sunshine. New Mexico also has one of the most prolific U.S. uranium producing regions and has a significant portion of the nation's known uranium reserves.3,4,5,6,7 However, it is the state's crude oil, natural gas, and coal production that place New Mexico among the nation's top 10 energy-producing states.8

New Mexico is one of the top 10 energy producers in the nation.

New Mexico's lowest elevation is more than half a mile above sea level and its highest point, Wheeler Peak in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, rises to more than two miles above sea level. The climate varies widely by location and elevation, from the deserts in the south, where summer temperatures above 100°F are common, to snowy peaks in the north, where winter temperatures have fallen to 50°F below zero.9 New Mexico ranks 36th in population and is the 5th-largest state by land area.10 As a result, the state is the sixth-least densely populated in the nation.11 More than one in four residents live in the city of Albuquerque, and much of the state has fewer than five people per square mile. On average, New Mexico has about 17 people per square mile.12,13

In 2019, New Mexico ranked among the top 20 states in per capita energy consumption. New Mexico's industrial sector accounted for about one-third of the state's total end-use energy consumption. The transportation sector used more energy per capita than in about three-fourths of the states and accounted for slightly more than three-tenths of New Mexico's total end-use energy consumption.14 The rest of the state's energy use was evenly split between the residential sector and the commercial sector.15 The residential sector consumed less energy per capita than in all but 10 other states despite New Mexico's weather extremes.16 Although energy-intensive industries, such as oil and natural gas production and mining, account for almost one-tenth of New Mexico's GDP, nearly three-tenths of state GDP is from less energy-intensive service sector businesses. Government activities, including the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories, account for one-fourth of state GDP and more than one-fifth of non-farm jobs in New Mexico.17,18 Overall, the state's energy intensity—the amount of energy needed to produce each dollar of GDP—is greater than in two-thirds of the states.19

Petroleum

In 2021, New Mexico became the nation’s second-largest crude oil-producing state after Texas.

In 2021, New Mexico became the nation's second-largest crude oil-producing state, after Texas, when it surpassed North Dakota's production.20 New Mexico has about 9% of U.S. total proved crude oil reserves and has the second-largest number of federal leases and the largest number of producing oil and gas wells on federal lands.21,22 The state accounted for more than 11% of total U.S. crude oil production in 2021.23 New Mexico's crude oil production was steady for several decades, but it increased significantly during the past 10 years, including in 2020 when most oil-producing states experienced production declines because of lower petroleum demand and crude oil prices during the COVID-19 pandemic. In 2021, annual production reached an all-time high of about 460 million barrels, more than five times greater than it was in 2012.24 Most of New Mexico's crude oil production comes from the Permian Basin, which is located in eastern New Mexico and western Texas. The Permian Basin is one of the most prolific crude oil-producing areas in the nation and the world.25,26 Advanced drilling and oil recovery technologies have increased production from the Basin's low-permeability shale formations.27,28 New Mexico's crude oil production exceeded 1 million barrels per day for the first time in 2020 and rose above 1.2 million barrels per day in 2021.29 Pipeline operators have accommodated New Mexico's increased crude oil production with pipeline expansions and new construction.30

New Mexico's one remaining crude oil refinery is located in Artesia in southeastern New Mexico. It has a refining capacity of about 110,000 barrels of crude oil per calendar day and can process both heavy sour and light sweet crude oils.31 Most of the crude oil processed at Artesia comes from the Permian Basin, but some comes by pipeline from other areas, including Canada. The refinery serves markets in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico.32 A second, small refinery in northwestern New Mexico, which processed local San Juan Basin crude oil, closed in 2020.33

New Mexico's per capita petroleum consumption is greater than in about two-thirds of the states.34 The transportation sector is the leading petroleum consumer in New Mexico and accounts for about four-fifths of all petroleum used in the state.35 More than half of that petroleum is consumed as motor gasoline.36 Metropolitan Albuquerque is the only area in the state that requires the use of oxygenated motor gasoline to reduce carbon dioxide emissions.37,38 Ethanol is used as the oxygenate and is blended with motor gasoline at fuel terminals. New Mexico accounts for less than 1% of the nation's fuel ethanol consumption, and, because the state does not have any commercial fuel ethanol production, needed ethanol supplies come from the Midwest.39,40,41 The industrial sector is the second-largest petroleum consumer in New Mexico, and it accounts for about one-seventh of the petroleum used in the state. The residential and commercial sectors each consume about 2%, and the electric power sector uses about 1%.42 About 6 in 100 New Mexico households use petroleum products, almost entirely propane, for home heating.43

Natural gas

New Mexico is among the top 10 natural gas producers in the nation.

New Mexico is among the top 10 natural gas producers in the nation and has abundant natural gas deposits in the northwestern and southeastern parts of the state.44,45 Almost 6% of U.S. proved natural gas reserves are in New Mexico. In 2021, the state's natural gas withdrawals exceeded 2 trillion cubic feet for the first time, and New Mexico accounted for 6% of the nation's total natural gas production.46,47 Natural gas is produced from shales, low permeability sands, and coalbeds in the San Juan Basin in northwestern New Mexico and from oil and gas wells in the Permian Basin in southeastern New Mexico.48 In 2020, New Mexico's natural gas production from shale gas wells was more than 13 times greater than it was in 2011 and accounted for more than three-fifths of the natural gas produced in the state.49,50 New Mexico is 1 of 15 states that produce natural gas from coalbeds. In 2020, the state was second only to Colorado in coalbed methane production. Even though New Mexico's coalbed methane production declined to just one-third of its 2007 peak of more than 616 billion cubic feet, it accounted for one-fourth of the nation's total in 2020.51,52

Interstate pipelines bring natural gas into New Mexico from Texas and Colorado, and carry most of the natural gas that leaves the state to Arizona or back to Texas. Because New Mexico produces much more natural gas than it consumes, almost three times as much natural gas leaves the state as enters it.53,54,55 Some of New Mexico's natural gas is placed in the state's two underground storage fields.56 Those fields have a combined storage capacity of about 89 billion cubic feet of natural gas, or about 1% of the nation's total storage capacity.57

Although New Mexico is among the top 10 states in the nation in per capita natural gas consumption, the state consumed less than one-sixth of the natural gas it produced in 2019.58,59 Because New Mexico is a major natural gas producer, less than two-thirds of the natural gas consumed in the state goes to end users. The remaining more than one-third is used in the production, processing, and distribution of natural gas. The electric power sector is New Mexico's largest natural gas user. In 2020, electric power generation accounted for almost 57% of the state's deliveries to natural gas end-use consumers. The state's residential sector, where about three in five households use natural gas as their primary energy source for home heating, accounted for nearly 20% of end-use deliveries. The commercial sector accounted for almost 14%, and the industrial sector used nearly 10%. The transportation sector consumed a small amount as compressed natural gas vehicle fuel.60,61

Coal

New Mexico has almost 3% of the nation's estimated recoverable coal reserves. In 2020, it was among the 10 states with the largest demonstrated reserve base.62 Most of the state's known coal reserves are in northern New Mexico in the San Juan and Raton Basins. The San Juan Basin is the state's largest coal-bearing region and the only area currently being mined.63,64 In 2020, New Mexico's coal production from its three active mines was slightly more than 10 million tons, about 2% of U.S. total coal production. However, that was only about one-third of the almost 30 million tons of coal the state produced in 2001.65,66 In 2020, all of the coal mined in New Mexico was used for power generation in either New Mexico or Arizona. None of the state's coal was exported to other countries.67 Industrial facilities in New Mexico received a small amount of coal from Colorado.68

Electricity

In 2021, renewable resources provided the largest share of New Mexico’s in-state electricity generation for the first time.

In 2021, renewable resources accounted for the largest share of New Mexico's in-state electricity generation, about 36% of power from utility-scale (1 megawatt or larger) facilities and a total of 37% from utility-scale and small-scale (less than 1 megawatt) facilities combined. For the first time, renewable energy contributed more to New Mexico's in-state power supply than either coal or natural gas. Wind alone accounted for 30% of total in-state generation, and it provided five times more power in 2021 than in 2015.69 In 2021, coal contributed slightly less power than renewable resources, at about 35% of total in-state generation. That was less than half of in-state generation for the fourth year in a row and down from its peak of 89% in 2004.70 Coal-fired generation declined in part because of air quality regulations, more competitively priced natural gas supplies, and as a result of California's decision in 2014 to stop purchasing coal-fired generation from other states.71 New Mexico's two largest power plants are coal-fired, but the San Juan Generating Station, the second-largest, is scheduled for retirement in mid-2022.72 A third coal-fired power plant retired in 2020.73 As coal's share of New Mexico's in-state generation declined, the contribution from natural gas increased. Natural gas provided about 28% of in-state generation in 2021, up from about 9% in 2004 but down from about 35% in 2020.74 All of New Mexico's proposed electricity generating capacity will use renewable energy, natural gas, or batteries.75

New Mexico has no nuclear power plants, but it does have the second-largest uranium reserves in the nation.76,77 Although there are no active uranium mines in New Mexico, uranium was mined in the state between 1948 and 2002. Several companies have plans to recover uranium by in-situ leaching.78 That process avoids removing the ore from depth by chemically dissolving the mineral in place and then pumping the solution to the surface for uranium recovery.79 Two new uranium in-situ leaching plants are in development in New Mexico's San Juan Basin. Those plants are in the permitting and licensing process and will have an anticipated combined capacity of 2 million pounds per year.80

In 2021, New Mexico's industrial sector accounted for nearly two-fifths of electricity retail sales, and the commercial sector accounted for one-third. The residential sector, where almost one in four households use electricity as the primary source for home heating, accounted for almost three-tenths.81,82 New Mexico's per capita residential electricity retail sales are less than in all but eight states, and New Mexico uses less total electricity per capita than about three-fifths of the states.83 Because the state consumes less electricity than it produces, New Mexico is a net supplier of electricity to neighboring states.84

Renewable energy

New Mexico has substantial renewable resources, much of them still undeveloped. In 2021, renewable resources provided the largest share of in-state electricity generation, at almost two-fifths. Power from renewable energy more than doubled since 2017, both in megawatthours and in share of total generation.85 There is significant wind energy potential on the high plains in the eastern half of the state, and the state ranks 11th in wind energy potential.86 In 2021, wind energy contributed most of New Mexico's renewable generation and provided the second-largest share, after coal, of total in-state net generation.87,88 The largest wind farm in the state, a 522-megawatt wind facility in eastern New Mexico, came online in December 2020. More than 1,700 megawatts of capacity were added in 2021.89 At the beginning of 2022, New Mexico ranked 10th in the nation in wind capacity, with almost 4,300 megawatts installed.90 Additional wind projects are under construction or planned.91 In January 2022, the Western Spirit Wind project completed construction. That project is at four sites in New Mexico and has a combined total generating capacity of 1,050 megawatts.92

New Mexico's climate is typified by abundant sunshine, and the state ranks third in the nation, after Nevada and Arizona, in solar energy potential.93,94 Utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) facilities provided 5% of New Mexico's total in-state net generation in 2021, and small-scale (less than 1 megawatt), customer-sited solar PV installations supplied about 1%.95 New Mexico does not have any in-state solar thermal electricity net generation, but the Sandia National Laboratories, headquartered in Albuquerque, is the home of the National Solar Thermal Testing Facility, which provides data for the design, construction, and operation of components used in solar thermal power plants that concentrate the sun's rays to generate power.96

New Mexico has the nation's sixth-largest geothermal potential, most of which is in the southwestern and north-central parts of the state.97 Geothermal energy has many direct use applications. It is used to heat greenhouses in New Mexico, many of which are used to raise the state's famed green chilies, and for aquaculture. Geothermal energy also is used for space heating, district heating, and spas.98 In December 2013, the state's first and only utility-scale geothermal power plant came online in southwestern New Mexico. In 2018, the plant added a new generating unit that increased its nameplate capacity from 4 megawatts to about 19 megawatts.99 Biomass contributes a minor amount to New Mexico's electricity net generation, but about 7% of New Mexico households heat with wood.100,101 The state's biomass resources and wood product manufacturing waste provide the feedstock for three wood pellet manufacturing plants. Those plants can produce a combined total of 14,000 tons annually. Wood pellets are used for heating and electricity generation.102

In 2019, New Mexico revised its 2004 renewable portfolio standard (RPS) and increased the state's required renewable energy targets. The 2019 law set new goals for investor-owned utilities of 50% of electricity retail sales from renewable resources by 2030, 80% by 2040, and 100% by 2045. Rural electric cooperatives have until 2050 to reach the 100% requirement. The legislation defines renewable energy as electric energy generated by low- or zero-emissions sources with substantial long-term production potential. It does not include nuclear power or any fossil energy fueled generation. Qualifying sources include: solar; wind; geothermal; biomass; hydropower facilities brought in service after July 1, 2007; and fuel cells that are not fossil energy-fueled. Electric cooperatives may count energy produced by geothermal heat pumps toward their requirements.103 New Mexico also has regulatory and fiscal policies that encourage renewable energy and energy efficiency measures. Those include net metering, solar easements, interconnection standards, and financial incentives.104

Energy on tribal lands

New Mexico is home to 23 federally recognized Native American tribes.105 Tribal lands cover more than one-tenth of the state, giving New Mexico the third-largest tribal acreage, after Alaska and Arizona, among all states.106 Two of New Mexico's largest reservations—the Jicarilla Apache Reservation and the Navajo Reservation—are in the crude oil and natural gas-rich Four Corners region of northwestern New Mexico.107 The Jicarilla Apache Nation's reservation is on the east flank of the San Juan Basin, a prolific natural gas and crude oil-producing area in the Four Corners region. The tribe is the second-largest mineral rights owner in the basin after the federal government, and also has within its reservation's boundaries several oil and gas fields.108 The Navajo Nation, whose reservation is in portions of three states, has oil and gas operations on its lands in the San Juan Basin in New Mexico and has additional potential for crude oil and natural gas recovery from shale formations using horizontal drilling and hydraulic-fracturing technologies.109 The Navajo Nation also has several fields in southeastern Utah and owns and operates a crude oil pipeline between New Mexico and Utah.110 The Nation owns the Navajo Mine, located on reservation land in New Mexico's San Juan Basin. That mine is the source of the coal used by the Four Corners Generating Station, the largest power plant in New Mexico, which is also on the reservation.111,112 In 2018, the Navajo Nation expanded its holdings and acquired an interest in the Four Corners Generating Station.113

All of New Mexico, including the tribal areas, has significant solar energy resources.114 In late 2020, New Mexico's largest electric utility broke ground for a solar farm on the Jicarilla Apache Nation reservation land as part of a partnership between the tribe and the utility. The 50-megawatt facility will be the third-largest solar project on tribal land in the nation, and the tribe will receive 2 megawatts of power as part of the agreement. The project is expected to be operational in 2022.115,116 In 2017, with the assistance of a $1 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Picuris Pueblo of northern New Mexico completed a 1-megawatt community solar PV array that offset 100% of the cost of the energy previously used by the tribal buildings and residences on Picuris trust land.117 In 2018, the Pueblo received funding to develop a second 1-megawatt generating system.118,119 Several other New Mexico tribes use small-scale, customer-sited solar PV installations. In 2017, the Santo Domingo Tribe completed installation of a 115-kilowatt PV system to power the tribe's community water pump and water treatment facility.120,121

Almost all New Mexico reservations have some geothermal resource potential, and DOE identified several tribal areas in the state with geothermal potential. However, there are no geothermal-powered generating facilities on New Mexico tribal lands.122,123 Although some ridges on reservation lands have wind energy resources, New Mexico's greatest wind energy potential is in the east, and most of the state's tribal lands are in the west.124,125

Endnotes

1 NETSTATE, The Geography of New Mexico, updated February 25, 2016.
2 U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Earth Observatory, Mesas and Mountains of Western New Mexico, accessed March 14, 2022.
3 U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Crude Oil Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production, Proved reserves as of December 31, 2020.
4 U.S. EIA, Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of December 31, 2020.
5 U.S. EIA, Annual Coal Report 2019 (October 2020), Table 14, Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines by State, 2020 and 2019.
6 Roberts, Billy J., Direct Normal Solar Irradiance, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (February 22, 2018).
7 Uranium Producers of America, Uranium in America, Uranium in New Mexico, accessed March 14, 2022.
8 U.S. EIA, New Mexico, Rankings: Total Energy Production, 2019.
9 Western Regional Climate Center, Climate of New Mexico, accessed March 14, 2022.
10 U.S. Census Bureau, State Population Totals and Components of Change: 2020-2021, Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for the United States, Regions, States, District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021.
11 States 101, U.S. States Populations, Land Area, and Population Density, accessed March 14, 2022.
12 U.S. Census Bureau, Quick Facts, New Mexico; Albuquerque (city), New Mexico; United States, Population estimates July 1, 2021.
13 U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census: New Mexico Profile, Population Density by Census Tract.
14 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table C14, Total Energy Consumption Estimates per Capita by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2019.
15 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table C11, Energy Consumption Estimates by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2019.
16 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table C14, Total Energy Consumption Estimates per Capita by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2019.
17 U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, Interactive Data, Regional Data, GDP and Personal Income, Annual Gross Domestic Product by State, Current Dollars, New Mexico, All Statistics in Table, 2020.
18 New Mexico Economic Development Department, Employment & Industry, Nonfarm Employment Industry Growth & Detail, accessed March 22, 2022.
19 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table C10, Total Energy Consumption Estimates, Real Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Energy Consumption Estimates per Real Dollar of GDP, Ranked by State, 2019.
20 U.S. EIA, Crude Oil Production, Annual, 2021.
21 U.S. EIA, U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Year-end 2020, Table 6, Proved reserves, reserves changes, and production of crude oil and lease condensate, 2020.
22 U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Public Land Statistics 2020 (June 2021), Table 3-17, Continuing Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Activities on Federal Lands as of September 30, 2020, p. 104-105.
23 U.S. EIA, Crude Oil Production, Annual, 2021.
24 U.S. EIA, New Mexico Field Production of Crude Oil, Thousand Barrels, Annual, 1981-2021.
25 Cook, Mike, "Oil and gas production boomed in New Mexico in 2021," Las Cruces Journal (January 12, 2022).
26 DiChristopher, Tom, "The Permian Basin in Texas and New Mexico will soon become the third-biggest oil producing region in the world: IHS Markit," CNBC (June 13, 2018).
27 U.S. EIA, "Six formations are responsible for surge in Permian Basin crude oil production," Today in Energy (July 9, 2014).
28 New Mexico Bureau of Geology & Mineral Resources, Oil & Gas Program, Importance of Oil & Gas in New Mexico, accessed March 22, 2022.
29 U.S. EIA, New Mexico Field Production of Crude Oil, Annual, Thousand Barrels per Day, 1981-2021.
30 U.S. EIA, "Permian region crude oil prices have increased with additional pipeline takeaway capacity," Today in Energy (March 26, 2019).
31 U.S. EIA, Refinery Capacity Report (June 2021), Table 3, Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by State as of January 1, 2021, p. 14.
32 HF Sinclair, Navajo Refinery, accessed March 23, 2022.
33 U.S. EIA, "Refinery closures decreased U.S. refinery capacity during 2020," Today in Energy (July 8, 2021).
34 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table C15, Petroleum Consumption Estimates, Total and per Capita, Ranked by State, 2019.
35 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table F16, Total Petroleum Consumption Estimates, 2019.
36 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table C8, Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2019.
37 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, State Winter Oxygenated Fuel Program Requirements for Attainment or Maintenance of CO NAAQS, EPA-420-B-03-003, October 2001.
38 Larson, B. K., U.S. Gasoline Requirements, As of January 2018, ExxonMobil (January 2018).
39 U.S. EIA, Table F25, Fuel ethanol consumption estimates, 2020.
40 U.S. EIA, U.S. Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity, XLS, U.S. Nameplate Fuel Ethanol Production Capacity, January 2021.
41 U.S. EIA, Movements by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts, Fuel Ethanol, Annual, 2021.
42 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table F16, Total Petroleum Consumption Estimates, 2019.
43 U.S. Census Bureau, New Mexico, Table B25040, Home Heating Fuel, 2019 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates.
44 U.S. EIA, Rankings: Natural Gas Marketed Production, 2020.
45 U.S. EIA, New Mexico Profile Overview, Map, Layers/Legend, Oil and Gas Wells, Gas Wells: High-Level View, accessed March 23, 2022.
46 U.S. EIA, Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31, Wet Natural Gas, 2020.
47 U.S. EIA, Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production, Gross Withdrawals, Annual, 2016-21.
48 NGI's Shale Daily, Information on the San Juan Basin, accessed March 23, 2022.
49 U.S. EIA, Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production, New Mexico, Annual, 2016-21.
50 U.S. EIA, New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas, 2007-20.
51 U.S. EIA, Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production, Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells, Annual, 2015-20.
52 U.S. EIA, New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Coalbed Wells, 2002-20.
53 U.S. EIA, International and Interstate Movements of Natural Gas by State, New Mexico, 2015-20.
54 U.S. EIA, Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production, Gross Withdrawals, Annual, 2016-21.
55 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table F18, Natural Gas Consumption Estimates, 2020.
56 U.S. EIA, Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity, Total Number of Existing Fields, 2020.
57 U.S. EIA, Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity, Total Storage Capacity, 2020.
58 U.S.EIA, State Energy Data System, Table C16, Natural Gas Consumption Estimates, Total and per Capita, Ranked by State, 2019.
59 U.S. EIA, Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production, New Mexico, Annual, 2016-21.
60 U.S. EIA, Natural Gas Consumption by End Use, New Mexico, 2016-21.
61 U.S. Census Bureau, New Mexico, Table B25040, Home Heating Fuel, 2019 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates.
62 U.S. EIA, Annual Coal Report 2020 (October 2021), Table 15, Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve Base by Mining Method, 2020.
63 New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources, Importance of Coal Production in New Mexico, accessed March 24, 2022.
64 New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources, FAQ-Coal Mine Reclamation Program, accessed March 24, 2022.
65 U.S. EIA, Coal Data Browser, Aggregate coal mine production for all coal (short tons), United States, New Mexico, 2001-20.
66 U.S. EIA, Annual Coal Report 2020 (October 2021), Table 2, Coal Production and Number of Mines by State, County, and Mine Type, 2020.
67 U.S. EIA, Annual Coal Distribution Report 2020 (October 2021), U.S. Domestic and Foreign Coal Distribution by State of Origin.
68 U.S. EIA, Annual Coal Distribution Report 2020 (October 2021), New Mexico Table OS-14, Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 2020, and Table DS-26, Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination State, 2020.
69 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors, New Mexico, All Fuel Types, Annual, 2001-21.
70 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors, New Mexico, Coal, Annual, 2001-21.
71 New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department, Seizing our Energy Potential: Creating a More Diverse Economy in New Mexico, New Mexico Energy Policy & Implementation Plan (2015), Energy Market Expansion, p. 21.
72 U.S. EIA, New Mexico Electricity Profile 2020, Tables 2A, 2B.
73 U.S. EIA, Electricity, Form EIA-860 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-860A/860B), 2020 Form EIA-860 Data, Schedule 3, 'Generator Data' (Operable Units Only).
74 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors, New Mexico, All fuels, Natural gas, Annual, 2001-21.
75 U.S. EIA, Electricity, Form EIA-860 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-860A/860B), 2020 Form EIA-860 Data, Schedule 3, 'Generator Data' (Proposed Units Only).
76 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, New Mexico, updated November 25, 2020.
77 U.S. EIA, U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates, Summary (July 2010).
78 McLemore, Virginia T., "Uranium Resources in New Mexico," New Mexico Bureau of Geology & Mineral Resources, updated January 27, 2020.
79 Ulmer-Scholle, Dana S., "Uranium—How Is It Mined?" New Mexico Bureau of Geology & Mineral Resources, accessed March 27, 2022.
80 U.S. EIA, Domestic Uranium Production Report, Annual, Table 5, U.S. uranium in-situ leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2016-20.
81 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Retail sales of electricity, Annual, New Mexico, All sectors, 2021.
82 U.S. Census Bureau, New Mexico, Table B25040, Home Heating Fuel, 2019 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates.
83 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table C17, Electricity Retail Sales per Capita, Ranked by State, 2019.
84 U.S. EIA, New Mexico Electricity Profile 2020, Table 10, Supply and disposition of electricity, 1990 through 2020.
85 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors, New Mexico, All fuels, Conventional hydroelectric, Other renewables (total), Small-scale solar photovoltaic, Annual, 2001--21.
86 New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department, Seizing our Energy Potential: Creating a More Diverse Economy in New Mexico, New Mexico Energy Policy & Implementation Plan (2015), New Mexico Energy Background, p. 8.
87 U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, WINDExchange, New Mexico 80-Meter Wind Resource Map, accessed March 27, 2022.
88 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors, New Mexico, Fuel Type (Check all), Annual, 2001--21.
89 U.S. EIA, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory (based on Form EIA-860M as a supplement to Form EIA-860), Inventory of Operating Generators as of January 2022.
90 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Monthly (March 2022), Table 6.2.B.
91 U.S. EIA, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory (based on Form EIA-860M as a supplement to Form EIA-860), Inventory of Planned Generators as of January 2022.
92 Pattern Energy, "Pattern Energy Completes Construction of Largest Single-Phase Renewable Energy Project in U.S. History," Press Release (January 6, 2022).
93 Western Regional Climate Center, Climate of New Mexico, Sunshine, accessed March 28, 2022.
94 Nebraska Energy Office, Comparison of Solar Power Potential by State, accessed March 28, 2022.
95 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors, New Mexico, All Fuels, Utility-scale photovoltaic, Utility-scale thermal, Small-scale solar photovoltaics, Annual, 2021.
96 Sandia National Laboratories, Energy, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, accessed March 28, 2022.
97 New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department, Seizing our Energy Potential: Creating a More Diverse Economy in New Mexico, New Mexico Energy Policy & Implementation Plan (2015), New Mexico Energy Background, p. 7-8.
98 National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Geothermal Energy Heat from the Earth, New Mexico, DOE/GO-102002-1563 (April 2002).
99 U.S. EIA, Electricity, Form EIA-860 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-860A/860B), 2020 Form EIA-860 Data, Schedule 3, 'Generator Data' (Operable Units Only).
100 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors, New Mexico, All Fuels, Biomass, Annual, 2021.
101 U.S. Census Bureau, New Mexico, Table B25040, Home Heating Fuel, 2019 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates.
102 U.S. EIA, Monthly Densified Biomass Fuel Report, Table 1, Densified biomass fuel manufacturing facilities in the United States by state, region, and capacity, December 2021, West.
103 NC Clean Energy Technology Center, DSIRE, Renewable Portfolio Standard, New Mexico, updated March 12, 2020.
104 NC Clean Energy Technology Center, DSIRE, Programs, New Mexico, accessed March 29, 2022.
105 U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, "Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible to Receive Services from the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs," Federal Register, Vol. 87, No. 19 (January 28, 2022), p. 4636-41.
106 U.S. Forest Service, Forest Service National Resource Guide to American Indian and Alaska Native Relations, Appendix D: Indian Nations, The American Indian Digest (April 1997), Table D-2, State with the Greatest Acreages of Indian Land.
107 Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico, Native Nation Lands, New Mexico (June 1, 2011).
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