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Utah   Utah Profile

State Profile and Energy Estimates

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Profile AnalysisPrint State Energy Profile
(overview, data, & analysis)

Last Updated: March 18, 2021

Overview

Utah has both fossil and renewable energy resources and is a net energy supplier to neighboring states.

Utah is a state of contrasts, from flat salt desert to rugged canyons, and from mountains soaring more than 13,000 feet above sea level in the northeast to the desert floor 9,000 feet lower in the southwest.1 The state has a variety of energy resources, including crude oil, natural gas, coal, and several forms of renewable energy.2 An arid state with abundant sunshine, Utah is among the states with the largest solar resources.3,4 Wind, hydropower, and geothermal resources are also major contributors to the state's electricity generation from renewables.5 About 80% of Utah's residents live along the Wasatch Front in the north-central part of the state in the Salt Lake City area. Landfills in that area provide the state with a biomass resource for electricity generation.6 Although Utah was the fourth fastest-growing state by population in 2020, most of the state is lightly populated.7,8

The energy industry is an important component of Utah's economy, and the state produces more energy than it consumes, enabling it to supply energy to neighboring states.9 Royalties from energy development on extensive state trust lands typically are the largest source of income for Utah's public-school trust fund.10 About 63% of Utah's land is owned by the federal government, the second-highest share after Nevada's 80%.11 Among the 50 states, Utah has the fourth-highest number of producing oil and natural gas leases on federal lands.12 In February 2020, the federal Bureau of Land Management reduced the size of the Bears Ears National Monument and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, increasing the amount of land available for possible mining and oil and gas extraction activities within the state. The plan has been challenged in the courts.13 In January 2021, the Biden administration ordered a review of restoring the monuments to their original borders.14

Energy consumption in Utah is led by the transportation sector, which accounts for almost one-third of the state's total, followed by the industrial sector at about one-fourth. The residential sector and the commercial sector each account for about one-fifth of the state's energy consumption.15 Despite temperatures that vary greatly with season and altitude, ranging from well above 100°F in the south in the summer to well below zero in the north in the winter, energy consumption per capita in Utah is below the national average and less than in two-thirds of the states. Per capita energy consumption in Utah's residential sector is the third-lowest, after Hawaii and California.16,17 The state's economy is largely service-oriented with finance, insurance, and real estate as the biggest contributors, followed by professional and business services, government spending, and the manufacturing sector. Utah's energy intensity—the amount of energy needed to produce each dollar of state gross domestic product (GDP)—is near the national average.18,19

Petroleum

Utah accounts for 1 of every 10 barrels of crude oil produced in the Rocky Mountain region.

Utah has slightly less than 1% of the nation's proved crude oil reserves.20 In addition to conventional crude oil reservoirs, northeastern Utah overlays part of the Green River oil shale, a potential oil resource. Eastern Utah also has the largest U.S. deposit of oil sands. However, extraction technology for the state's oil shale and oil sand resources has been water-intensive and uneconomic.21,22 Utah accounts for almost 1 in every 100 barrels of crude oil produced in the United States and 1 of every 10 barrels produced in the Rocky Mountain region.23 Oil drilling operations and producing wells are concentrated in the Uinta Basin in northeastern Utah and the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah.24,25 The state's oil production tripled between 2003 and 2014, but declined for several years afterward as crude oil prices and the number of new wells drilled decreased. After increasing for two years in a row in 2017 and 2018, Utah's oil production fell slightly in 2019 and dropped sharply in 2020 following the decline in petroleum demand and oil prices during the COVID-19 pandemic.26,27,28

Utah's five oil refineries, all located in the Salt Lake City area, process nearly 200,000 barrels of crude oil per calendar day. Much of the oil processed by the refineries is brought in by pipeline from Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, and Canada.29,30 Utah's refineries, which have about three-tenths of the refining capacity in the Rocky Mountain region, produce mostly motor gasoline, diesel fuel, and jet fuel.31,32 Pipelines carry refined products from Salt Lake City's refineries to markets in Utah, Idaho, Nevada, Wyoming, eastern Washington, and Oregon. Petroleum products also enter Utah by pipeline from refineries in Wyoming and Montana.33,34,35

Utah's petroleum consumption per capita ranks among the lowest one-third of the states.36 Slightly more than four-fifths of the petroleum consumed in the state is used by the transportation sector.37 To help reduce ground-level ozone during the summer months, Utah requires the use of motor gasoline blended with ethanol in four counties in the densely populated north central part of the state, including the Salt Lake City, Ogden, and Provo-Orem metropolitan areas. The rest of the state can use conventional motor gasoline that is not required to be blended with ethanol.38,39,40 Utah does not have any ethanol production facilities, and the ethanol blended with motor gasoline at the state's fuel terminals is supplied by rail from the Midwest.41,42 Propane, fuel oil, and kerosene are used to heat only 2 in 100 Utah households, and total petroleum consumption in the state's residential sector is lower than in all states but Nevada, Louisiana, and Hawaii.43,44

Natural gas

Although Utah holds less than 1% of the nation's proved natural gas reserves, the state has 3 of the 100 largest U.S. natural gas fields.45,46,47 Utah's marketed natural gas production, most of which is in Uintah County in the northeastern corner of the state, accounted for about 1% of U.S. natural gas output in 2020.48,49 The state's natural gas production rose steadily for three decades starting in the mid-1980s, and it peaked in 2012. Annual production has decreased every year since in response to low market prices and reduced crude oil drilling.50,51 Utah's coalbed methane production, which is natural gas produced from coal seams, peaked in 2007, when it accounted for almost one-fifth of the state's natural gas output. Coalbed methane production has gradually declined since then and in 2020 fell to less than half its peak output.52,53,54 In 2019, Utah consumed more natural gas than it produced in dry natural gas for the first time since 1991.55,56,57

Utah has the largest underground natural gas storage reservoir in the Rocky Mountain region.

Utah is crossed by several interstate pipelines that transport natural gas from the Opal Hub in Wyoming, from the Piceance Basin in western Colorado, and from Utah's in-state production to markets in Nevada, Idaho, and Colorado.58,59 Utah has 3 natural gas storage facilities with a combined storage capacity of almost 125 billion cubic feet, equal to slightly more than 1% of the nation's total natural gas storage capacity.60 The Clay Basin facility, on the Utah-Wyoming border near Colorado, is the largest underground storage reservoir in the Rocky Mountain region and the 14th largest in the nation. It can hold 120 billion cubic feet of gas.61,62

Utah's residential sector, where more than 8 in 10 households use natural gas as their primary heating fuel, is the state's largest consumer of natural gas, and accounted for almost one-third of gas deliveries. The electric power sector is close behind, and received slightly less than three-tenths of total natural gas deliveries, followed by the commercial and industrial sectors at about one-fifth each.63,64

Coal

Utah has about 1% of the nation's estimated recoverable coal reserves and accounts for 2% of U.S. coal production. Most active mines in the state are underground operations in central Utah. The only active surface coal mine is in the south near the Arizona border.65,66 About three-fifths of the coal mined in Utah is consumed in the state, mostly for electricity generation. About one-fourth of Utah's mined coal is exported to other countries and the rest is sent to other states, primarily to California and Nevada where the coal is used mostly at industrial facilities and some power plants. Utah receives some coal by rail from Colorado for electricity generation.67

After declining in 2018 to the lowest level in 33 years, Utah's coal production increased in 2019 because of higher demand from the overseas export market, although the state's output was down by one-third from a decade earlier. Utah's coal production declined again in 2020.68,69 The state's coal output has fallen and mines have shut down because of decreased demand for coal from the electric power sector and because some older coal mining areas are less profitable.70,71,72

Electricity

Since 2015, about 97% of Utah’s new electric generating capacity is powered by solar energy.

In 2020, coal fueled 61% of Utah's total electricity net generation, down from 75% five years earlier, and natural gas accounted for 25%. Almost all of the rest of Utah's in-state electricity generation came from renewable energy sources, primarily solar power.73 About 97% of Utah's electric generating capacity added since 2015 is powered by solar energy.74 While the state does not generate any electricity from nuclear energy, plans for a nuclear power plant near Green River, Utah are being considered.75,76

Utah has the nation's only operating uranium ore mill.77,78 The state has experienced several booms in uranium mining—in the 1950s during the Cold War, in the 1970s with the growth in the U.S. nuclear power industry, and in the mid-2000s when uranium prices increased. Mine closures followed when uranium demand and prices fell. The Utah mill processes uranium ore from mines in other states. There has been no uranium mine production in Utah since 2012.79,80,81,82

Utah generates more electricity than it consumes, and the state is a net supplier of power to other states.83 Utah's Strategic Energy Plan anticipates natural gas-fired generation will replace coal and will back up intermittent renewables like wind and solar power.84 No new coal-fired generators have been built in the state since 1993, but about 60 natural gas-fired units have been put into service since then.85 High-capacity transmission lines are being constructed to bring renewable power from Wyoming and Utah to Colorado, Idaho, Oregon, Nevada, and California, as well as to enhance reliability of electricity delivery within Utah.86

Utah's per capita electricity consumption is lower than in three-fourths of the states.87 The commercial sector consumes the most electricity—nearly two-fifth of the state's total. Consumption is fairly evenly divided at about three-tenths each between the residential sector and the industrial sector.88 Utah's average? electricity retail prices are near the lowest one-tenth of the states.89 Electricity is the primary energy source for home heating in about one in seven Utah households.90

Renewable energy

In 2020, about 14% of Utah's total electricity generation came from renewable energy sources. Solar energy generated more electricity than any other renewable resource in the state. Electricity generation from all solar facilities, both small-scale (less than 1 megawatt) and utility-scale (1-megawatt or larger), accounted for about 58% of the state's renewable generation and was 30 times greater than in 2015.91 At the end of 2020, Utah ranked 10th among the states in the amount of solar generating capacity, with 1,525 megawatts installed.92 The state requires investor-owned electric utilities and most electric cooperatives to offer net metering, which encourages installation of solar panels on residential rooftops.93 In 2020, about one-fifth of the state's solar power came from small-scale, customer-sited generating systems and the other four-fifths came from utility-scale solar generating facilities.94

Hydropower made up 19% of the state's renewable generation in 2020. The annual amount of hydropower generation depends on water availability from seasonal rains and melting snow.95 The state has 29 utility-scale hydroelectric plants. Half of those hydroelectric generating units are more than 60 years old, with the oldest one built in 1896.96

Wind energy produced about 15% of Utah's renewable electricity in 2020.97 Utah has five wind farms operating with about 390 megawatts of generating capacity.98 The state's two largest wind farms send power to southern California.99 There is commercial wind power potential in the Wasatch and Uinta mountain ranges in Utah's north-central region and on the mesas in western Utah.100

Utah is one of seven states with utility-scale electricity generation from geothermal sources. In 2020, three geothermal facilities in southwestern Utah provided about 7% of the state's renewable electricity generation.101,102,103,104 The state has some of the best geothermal potential in the nation, and more geothermal projects are in development.105,106,107,108

Utah seeks to have 20% of the electricity sold to state consumers generated from renewable sources by 2025.

Biomass, primarily in the form of landfill gas at facilities in the population centers on the Wasatch Front in north-central Utah, provided the remaining nearly 2% of the state's renewable electricity generation in 2020.109,110 The state has one wood pellet manufacturing plant, with an annual production capacity of 6,000 tons.111

Utah has a renewable portfolio goal that requires all electric utilities to pursue renewable energy when it is cost-effective. Each utility has a goal for 20% of its adjusted electricity retail sales to be generated from qualifying renewable sources by 2025. Renewable energy sources that meet this goal include: solar, wind, geothermal, hydroelectric, hydrogen, municipal solid waste, landfill gas, and farm animal manure.112

Endnotes

1 Davies, Robert, "Climate Utah—Cathedral Peaks, Monument Valleys, Ancient Lakes and the Greatest Snow on Earth," Utah's Climate, The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network, ‘State Climate Series,' accessed February 1, 2021.
2 Utah Governor's Office of Energy Development, Utah's Energy Resources, accessed February 1, 2021.
3 Current Results, Average Annual Sunshine by State, accessed February 1, 2021.
4 National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Direct Normal Solar Irradiance (February 22, 2018).
5 U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors (thousand megawatthours), Utah, Annual 2001-20.
6 U.S. EIA, Utah Profile Overview, Map, Layers/Legend: Biomass Power Plant, population density, accessed February 1, 2021.
7 U.S. Census Bureau, Vintage 2020 Population Estimates, Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for the Nation and States, Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for the United States, Regions, States, and the District of Columbia: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2020 (NST-EST2020).
8 U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census: Utah Profile, Population Density by Census Tract, accessed February 1, 2021.
9 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table P3, Total Primary Energy Production and Total Energy Consumption Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2018.
10 State of Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration, Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Report, p. 21.
11 Vincent, Carol H., et al., Federal Land Ownership: Overview and Data, Congressional Research Service (February 21, 2020), p. 7-8.
12 U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Public Land Statistics 2019 (June 2020), p. 107-109.
13 O'Donoghue, Amy Joi, "Interior approves final management plans for Bears Ears, Grand Staircase," Deseret News (February 6, 2020).
14 The White House, Executive Order on Protecting Public Health and the Environment and Restoring Science to Tackle the Climate Crisis, Sec. 3. Restoring National Monuments (January 20, 2021).
15 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table C11, Energy Consumption Estimates by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2018.
16 Davies, Robert, "Climate Utah—Cathedral Peaks, Monument Valleys, Ancient Lakes and the Greatest Snow on Earth," Utah's Climate, The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network, ‘State Climate Series,' accessed February 1, 2021.
17 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table C14, Total Energy Consumption Estimates per Capita by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2018.
18 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table C10, Total Energy Consumption Estimates, Real Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Energy Consumption Estimates per Real Dollar of GDP, Ranked by State, 2018.
19 U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, Interactive Data, Regional Data, GDP and Personal Income, Annual Gross Domestic Product (GDP) by State, GDP in current dollars, NAICS, Utah, All statistics in table, Utah, 2019.
20 U.S. EIA, Crude Oil Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production, Proved reserves as of 12/31, 2014-19.
21 Vanden Berg, Michael, Utah's Energy Landscape, Circular 121, Utah Geological Survey (2016), p. 34.
22 Krauss, Clifford, "A Plan to Unlock Billions of Barrels of Oil from Utah's Sands," The New York Times (August 21, 2018).
23 U.S. EIA, Crude Oil Production, Annual-Thousand Barrels, 2020.
24 Utah Governor's Office of Energy Development, Utah's Energy Resources, Petroleum, accessed February 2, 2021.
25 Wood, Rebekah E., and Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr., Oil and Gas Fields Map of Utah, Utah Geological Survey (2015).
26 U.S. EIA, Utah Field Production of Crude Oil, Annual, Monthly, Thousand Barrels, 1981-2020.
27 U.S. EIA, Petroleum Marketing Monthly (December 2020), Table 18, Domestic crude oil first purchase prices, PAD District 4, UT.
28 Utah Geological Survey, Utah Energy and Mineral Statistics, Table 3.3, Exploration and Drilling Activity (Oil and Gas) in Utah, 1960-2018.
29 U.S. EIA, Refinery Capacity 2020, Table 3, Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by State as of January 1, 2020.
30 Vanden Berg, Michael, Utah's Energy Landscape, Circular 121, Utah Geological Survey (2016), p. 26.
31 Vanden Berg, Michael, Utah's Energy Landscape, Circular 121, Utah Geological Survey (2016), p. 26.
32 U.S. EIA, Refinery Capacity 2020, Table 1, Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of January 1, 2020.
33 Utah Rails.net, Utah's Oil Industry and Utah's Railroads, updated February 4, 2020.
34 Phillips 66, Billings Refinery, accessed February 2, 2021.
35 Sinclair, Refineries, Sinclair Wyoming Refining Company, accessed February 2, 2021.
36 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table C15, Petroleum Consumption, Total and per Capita, Ranked by State, 2018.
37 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table F16, Total Petroleum Consumption Estimates, 2018.
38 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Gasoline Reid Vapor Pressure, State by State RVP Table, accessed February 2, 2021.
39 Utah State Bulletin, Utah Administrative Code, Rule R307-301. Utah and Weber Counties: Oxygenated Gasoline Program as a Contingency Measure (February 15, 2017), p. 63.
40 American Petroleum Institute, U.S. Gasoline Requirements (January 2018).
41 U.S. EIA, U.S. Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity (September 25, 2020), Detailed nameplate capacity of fuel ethanol plants by Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PAD District) are available in XLS.
42 The Scoular Co., "Scoular to Construct Utah Ethanol Distribution Terminal," Press Release (June 3, 2010).
43 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table C5, Residential Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2018.
44 U.S. Census Bureau, House Heating Fuel, Table B25040, 2019 ACS 1-Year Estimates Detailed Tables, Utah.
45 U.S. EIA, Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31, 2019.
46 U.S. EIA, Top 100 U.S. Oil & Gas Fields (March 2015), p. 8-10.
47 U.S. EIA, Coalbed Methane, Proved Reserves as of December 31, 2017.
48 Vanden Berg, Michael D., Utah's Energy Landscape, Circular 127, Utah Geological Survey (2020), p. 32, 34.
49 U.S. EIA, Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production, Marketed Production, Annual-Million Cubic Feet, 2015-20.
50 U.S. EIA, Utah Natural Gas Marketed Production, 1967-2020.
51 Vanden Berg, Michael D., Utah's Energy Landscape, Circular 127, Utah Geological Survey (2020), p. 34, 36.
52 U.S. EIA, Utah Natural Gas Marketed Production, 1967-2020.
53 U.S. EIA, Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells, 2002-20.
54 U.S. EIA, Glossary, Coalbed Methane, accessed February 3, 2021.
55 U.S. EIA, Natural Gas Annual Supply and Disposition by State, Utah, Annual, 2015-20.
56 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2018, Table CT1, Energy Consumption Estimates for Selected Energy Sources in Physical Units, Selected Years, 1960-2018, Utah.
57 U.S. EIA, Utah Dry Natural Gas Production, Annual, 1982-2019.
58 U.S. EIA, International and Interstate Movements of Natural Gas by State, Utah, 2014-19.
59 American Petroleum Institute, Where are the Pipelines? Natural Gas Pipelines, accessed February 3, 2021.
60 U.S. EIA, Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity, Total Storage Capacity and Total Number of Existing Fields, 2019.
61 Dominion Energy, Dominion Energy Questar Pipeline, LLC, accessed February 3, 2021.
62 U.S. EIA, Natural Gas Annual Respondent Query System, 191 Field Level Storage Data, 2019.
63 U.S. EIA, Natural Gas Consumption by End Use, Utah, 2014-19.
64 U.S. Census Bureau, House Heating Fuel, Table B25040, 2019 ACS 1-Year Estimates Detailed Tables, Utah.
65 U.S. EIA, Annual Coal Report 2019 (October 5, 2020), Table 1, Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Mine Type, 2019 and 2018; and Table 15, Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve Base by Mining Method, 2019.
66 Vanden Berg, Michael, Utah's Energy Landscape, Circular 121, Utah Geological Survey (2016), p. 16.
67 U.S. EIA, Annual Coal Distribution Report 2019 (October 5, 2020), Domestic distribution of U.S. coal by: Domestic and foreign distribution of U.S. coal by origin state, Utah; Origin State, consumer, destination and method of transportation, Utah Table 0S-24; and Destination State, consumer, destination and method of transportation, Utah Table DS-41.
68 U.S. EIA, Coal Data Browser, Aggregate coal mine production for all coal (short tons), Utah, 2001-19.
69 U.S. EIA, Quarterly Coal Report (January 4, 2021), Table 2, Coal production by state.
70 Mills, Stephanie, et al., Utah Mining 2019, Circular 130, Utah Geological Survey (2020), Coal, Production p. 26-28.
71 Vanden Berg, Michael, Utah's Energy Landscape, Circular 127, Utah Geological Survey (2020), p. 22-23.
72 Utah Economic Council, 2020 Economic Report to the Governor, p. 115.
73 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors (thousand megawatthours), Utah, 2001-20.
74 U.S. EIA, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory (based on Form EIA-860M as a supplement to Form EIA-860), Inventory of Operating Generators as of December 2020, Plant State: Utah, Technology: Select All.
75 Webb, Dennis, "Nuke plant unaffected by Westinghouse bankruptcy," The Daily Sentinel (April 13, 2017).
76 Blue Castle Project, accessed February 4, 2021.
77 U.S. EIA, Domestic Uranium Production Report-Annual (May 18, 2020), Table 4, U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2016-19.
78 Energy Fuels, White Mesa Mill, accessed February 4, 2021.
79 Vanden Berg, Michael, Utah's Energy Landscape, Circular 127, Utah Geological Survey (2020), p. 38-39.
80 World Nuclear Association, US Uranium Mining and Exploration, updated September 2020.
81 Mills, Stephanie, et al., Utah Mining 2019, Circular 130, Utah Geological Survey (2020), p. 24-26.
82 Utah Economic Council, 2020 Economic Report to the Governor, p. 125.
83 U.S. EIA, Utah Electricity Profile 2019, Table 10, Supply and disposition of electricity, 1990 through 2019.
84 Utah Governor's Office, Energy Initiatives and Imperatives: Utah's 10-Year Strategic Energy Plan 2.0, updated February 2014, p. 25-26.
85 U.S. EIA, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory (based on Form EIA-860M as a supplement to Form EIA-860), Inventory of Operating Generators as of December 2020, Plant State: Utah, Technology: Natural Gas.
86 Shallenberger, Krysti, "Feds greenlight pair of Western US transmission projects," Utility Dive (December 14, 2016).
87 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table C17, Electricity Retail Sales, Total and Residential, Total and per Capita, Ranked by State, 2018.
88 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table F20, Electricity Consumption Estimates, 2019.
89 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Monthly (February 2021), Table 5.6.B.
90 U.S. Census Bureau, House Heating Fuel, Table B25040, 2019 ACS 1-Year Estimates Detailed Tables, Utah.
91 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors (thousand megawatthours), Utah, 2001-20.
92 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Monthly (February 2021), Table 6.2.B.
93 NC Clean Energy Technology Center, DSIRE, Utah, Net Billing, updated March 27, 2019.
94 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors (thousand megawatthours), Utah, 2001-20.
95 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors (thousand megawatthours), Utah, 2001-20.
96 U.S. EIA, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory (based on Form EIA-860M as a supplement to Form EIA-860), Inventory of Operating Generators as of December 2020, Plant State: Utah, Technology: Conventional Hydroelectric.
97 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors (thousand megawatthours), Utah, 2001-20.
98 U.S. EIA, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory (based on Form EIA-860M as a supplement to Form EIA-860), Inventory of Operating Generators as of November December, Plant State: Utah, Technology: Onshore Wind Turbine.
99 Southern California Public Power Authority, Milford Wind Corridor Phase I and II, accessed February 11, 2021.
100 U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, WINDExchange, Wind Energy in Utah, Maps & Data, Utah 80-Meter Wind Resource Map, accessed February 11, 2021.
101 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Monthly (February 2021), Table 1.16.B.
102 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors (thousand megawatthours), Utah, 2001-20.
103 U.S. EIA, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory (based on Form EIA-860M as a supplement to Form EIA-860), Inventory of Operating Generators as of December 2020, Plant State: Utah, Technology: Geothermal.
104 Vanden Berg, Michael, Utah's Energy Landscape, Circular 127, Utah Geological Survey (2020), p. 12.
105 National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Geothermal Resource of the United States (February 22, 2018).
106 University of Utah, Kem C. Gardner Institute, Economic Impacts of Utah's Energy Industry, 2017, p. 22-23.
107 U.S. Department of Energy, "U.S. Department of Energy Selects University of Utah for $140 million Geothermal Research and Development," Press release (June 14, 2018).
108 National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Sedimentary Geothermal Resources in Nevada, Utah, Colorado, and Texas (August 2020), p. 20.
109 U.S. EIA, Electricity Data Browser, Net generation for all sectors (thousand megawatthours), Utah, 2001-20.
110 U.S. EIA, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory (based on Form EIA-860M as a supplement to Form EIA-860), Inventory of Operating Generators as of December 2020, Plant State: Utah, Technology: Landfill Gas.
111 U.S. EIA, Monthly Densified Biomass Fuel Report (February 17, 2021), Table 1,Densified biomass fuel manufacturing facilities in the United States by state, region, and capacity, October 2020.
112 NC Clean Energy Technology Center, DSIRE, Utah, Renewable Portfolio Goal, updated July 3, 2018.