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Sudan and South Sudan  Sudan Energy Profile  South Sudan Energy Profile

Sudan and South Sudan's Key Energy Statistics world rank
Total Primary Energy Production
2016
0.554
Quadrillion Btu
--
Total Primary Energy Consumption
2016
0.374
Quadrillion Btu
--
Total Petroleum and Other Liquids Production
2017
255
Thousand Barrels Per Day
--
Exports of Crude Oil including Lease Condensate
2016
157
Thousand Barrels Per Day
--
Crude Oil Proved Reserves
2018
5
Billion Barrels
--
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Map of Sudan and South Sudan
Map of Sudan and South Sudan

Analysis - Energy Sector Highlights Last updated: March 5, 2018

  • South Sudan gained independence from Sudan in July 2011. Although most of the oil production capacity in those two countries is in South Sudan, the country is landlocked and remains dependent on Sudan’s export pipelines and port. Civil unrest, disagreements over oil revenue sharing, and border disputes have curtailed oil production and investment in both countries.
  • After gaining independence in 1956, the unified Sudan fought two civil wars. The second civil war ended with a Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) between the Sudanese government and opposition forces in 2005, and the outcome of the 2011 referendum led to a newly created independent state: South Sudan. Border issues are a major source of tension between the two countries post-secession, and political dynamics in both countries pose significant security risks for the oil sector.
  • Most of Sudan’s and South Sudan’s proved reserves of oil and natural gas are located in the Muglad and Melut Basins, which extend into both countries. Natural gas associated with oil production is mostly flared or reinjected into wells, and neither country currently produces nor consumes dry natural gas.
  • Prolonged sanctions against the unified Sudan allowed Asian national oil companies to dominate Sudan’s and South Sudan’s oil sectors. The China National Petroleum Corporation, India’s Oil and Natural Gas Corporation, and Malaysia’s Petronas hold large stakes in the leading consortia that operate oil fields and pipelines. Sudan and South Sudan’s national oil companies, Sudapet and Nilepet, respectively, also hold small stakes in operations.
  • Sudan and South Sudan have experienced frequent disruptions to oil production because of disputes over oil revenue sharing and armed conflict. Maturing oil fields and persistent violence, in conjunction with a lower oil price environment, have dampened investor confidence in spite of efforts to attract foreign investment.

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Data