U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)
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A Day at EIA


    Behind the scenes at the nation's premier energy statistics and analysis agency

 

Collecting, analyzing, and sharing energy information

Every day, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) works to inform the public about energy trends that affect us all. We collect, analyze, and disseminate independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy. Click through to learn more about a typical day at EIA.

Today in Energy: The pulse of energy news and trends

At EIA, we begin each day with the publication of Today in Energy, a series of short, topical, and timely articles covering the latest energy news, information, and trends. After the morning's article is published, Today in Energy's cross-agency team meets to discuss upcoming articles and identify energy trends to address in the future.

At EIA, we begin each day with the publication of Today in Energy, a series of short, topical, and timely articles covering the latest energy news, information, and trends. After the morning’s article is published, Today in Energy’s cross-agency team meets to discuss upcoming articles and identify energy trends to address in the future.

Protecting and securing EIA data

People and markets rely on EIA data, so it's important to protect that data. Staff in EIA's Office of Resource and Technology Management maintain an energy efficient, state-of-the-art data center in the U.S. Department of Energy's Forrestal building. By maintaining and securing our data center, we are able to deliver energy data to the public in a timely and effective manner each day.

Presenting and sharing energy information with outside groups

EIA representatives meet regularly with external organizations and present at various conferences and events to discuss our energy analysis and forecasts. Staff from the Office of Energy Analysis (shown here), for example, meet with outside organizations such as the International Energy Agency, the National Association of State Energy Officials, the International Association for Energy Economics, the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, and the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, to name a few.

Sharing the excitement of energy with the public

Enhancing the public's understanding of energy is one of the pillars of EIA's mission. We plan events and conferences that bring energy information and statistics straight to the public, from today's energy experts to the next generation of energy leaders.

Evolving with the energy industry

As the energy industry evolves, EIA staff from the Office of Energy Statistics redesign or expand the agency's data collections to reflect those changes and to better meet the needs of our users. Staff discuss proposed changes with energy industry trade associations and federal agencies, and make formal presentations at conferences. They also conduct site visits with survey respondents to test questions, software, or new survey instruments.

Growing and developing as energy professionals

We never stop learning at EIA. Although we spend much of our time sharing energy data, statistics, and analysis with the public, we also work to expand our employees' knowledge of energy through training and professional development opportunities such as our Energy Industries Study Program.

Connecting with the media

EIA's Office of Communications works with media representatives from all over the world every day to share EIA's information and data. Among their responsibilities, our communications staff field media questions, arrange interviews with EIA subject matter experts, increase the agency's reach through social media, and organize several EIA press conferences each year.

Keeping the U.S. Secretary of Energy up-to-date on energy trends

As the principal statistical agency of the U.S. Department of Energy, EIA staff occasionally brief the U.S. Secretary of Energy, Dr. Ernest Moniz, on EIA data, projections, and agency initiatives. This is just one of many examples of how the statistics and analysis compiled by EIA professionals helps inform U.S. energy policies.

Does a day at EIA seem interesting to you?

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