Today in Energy

Apr 18, 2014

Eleven states generated electricity from nonhydro renewables at double U.S. average

map of percent of electric generation from non-hydro renewable sources by state (2013), as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Electric Power Monthly

About 6.2% of total U.S. electricity supplies in 2013 were generated from nonhydro renewable energy sources such as wind, solar, biomass, and geothermal, up from 5.4% in 2012. But 11 states produced electricity at more than twice the national average from these sources—accounting for between 14% and 32% of their net electric generation—according to preliminary 2013 generation data in EIA's Electric Power Monthly report.

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Apr 17, 2014

Gulf Coast crude oil inventories reach record level

graph of gulf coast commercial crude inventories, as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Weekly Petroleum Status Report

Crude oil inventories on the U.S. Gulf Coast (USGC) reached 207.2 million barrels (bbl) on April 11, a record high. The elevated inventory levels are the result of the continuing strong crude oil production growth, the opening of TransCanada's Marketlink Pipeline, and a drop in crude oil inputs at USGC refineries as a result of seasonal maintenance.

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Apr 16, 2014

Personal travel growth significantly influences projected transportation energy demand

graph of vehicle use by U.S. drivers, as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2014, Issues in Focus

Personal travel, measured in light-duty vehicle miles traveled (VMT) per licensed driver, reached 12,900 miles per year in 2007 and decreased to about 12,500 in 2012. This shift in travel behavior is important because it directly influences light-duty vehicle (LDV) energy demand for transportation fuels such as gasoline and diesel. Recent analysis suggests that multiple factors influence travel behavior. These include economic, demographic, technological, social, and environmental determinants that have the potential to significantly shift light-duty vehicle energy consumption.

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Apr 15, 2014

Twelve states produced 80% of U.S. wind power in 2013

map of electric generation from wind by state (2013), as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Electric Power Monthly

In 2013, 12 states accounted for 80% of U.S. wind-generated electricity, according to preliminary generation data released in EIA's March Electric Power Monthly report. Texas was again the top wind power state with nearly 36 million megawatthours (MWh) of electricity. Iowa was second, with more than 15 million MWh, followed by California, Oklahoma, Illinois, Kansas, Minnesota, Oregon, Colorado, Washington, North Dakota, and Wyoming.

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Apr 14, 2014

Liquefied natural gas shows potential as a freight locomotive fuel

graph of U.S. wet natural gas proved reserves, as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2014, Issues in Focus
Note: The dotted lines represent diesel fuel use, while the solid lines represent LNG fuel use.

EIA projects that liquefied natural gas (LNG) will play an increasing role in powering freight locomotives in coming years. Continued growth in domestic natural gas production and substantially lower natural gas prices compared to crude oil prices could result in significant cost savings for locomotives that use LNG as a fuel source, according to EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2014 (AEO2014).

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Apr 11, 2014

Lower prices pull down natural gas reserves in 2012

graph of U.S. wet natural gas proved reserves, as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves report

Lower natural gas prices drove down U.S. proved reserves in 2012, despite notable gains in the Marcellus and Eagle Ford shale gas plays. The decline stopped a 14-year trend of consecutive increases in natural gas reserves, according to newly published estimates in EIA's U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves 2012.

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Apr 10, 2014

Crude oil reserves at start of 2013 reach highest level since 1976

graph of regular-grade gasoline retail price and summer average, as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves report

U.S. crude oil proved reserves rose for the fourth consecutive year in 2012, increasing by 15% to 33 billion barrels, according to the U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves (2012) report released April 10 by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. U.S. crude oil and lease condensate proved reserves were the highest since 1976, and the 2012 increase of 4.5 billion barrels was the largest annual increase since 1970, when 10 billion barrels of Alaskan crude oil were added to U.S. proved reserves. Contributing factors to higher crude oil reserves include increased exploration for liquid hydrocarbons, improved technology for developing tight oil plays, and sustained high historical crude oil prices.

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Apr 9, 2014

Summer average gasoline price expected to be close to last year's level

graph of regular-grade gasoline retail price and summer average, as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy and Summer Fuels Outlook, April 2014

Drivers are expected to pay an average $3.57 per gallon for regular gasoline this summer, close to last year's level, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's April Short-Term Energy and Summer Fuels Outlook.

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Apr 8, 2014

Half of power plant capacity additions in 2013 came from natural gas

graph of U.S. power plant capacity additions in 2013, as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Electric Power Monthly, December 2013 edition
Note: Data include facilities with a net summer capacity of 1 MW and above only.
Note: See details by technology type.

Natural gas-fired power plants accounted for just over 50% of new utility-scale generating capacity added in 2013. Solar provided nearly 22%, a jump up from less than 6% in 2012. Coal provided 11% and wind nearly 8%. Almost half of all capacity added in 2013 was located in California. In total, a little over 13,500 megawatts (MW) of new capacity was added in 2013, less than half the capacity added in 2012.

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Apr 7, 2014

Tight oil-driven production growth reduces need for U.S. oil imports

graph of net import share of U.S. liquids consumption in three cases, as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2014

In the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 (AEO2014) Reference case, crude oil production rises from 6.5 million barrels per day (MMbbl/d) in 2012 to 9.6 MMbbl/d before 2020, a production level not seen since 1970. Tight oil production growth accounts for 81% of this increase, and sees its share of national crude oil production grow from 35% in 2012 to 50% in 2019. In the High Oil and Gas case, U.S. crude oil production reaches 11.3 MMbbl/d in 2019 and reaches 13.3 MMbbl/d in the mid-2030s.

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