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Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U. S.

Release Date: March 31, 2011   |  Next Release Date: Report Discontinued   |   Report Number: DOE/EIA-0573(2009)

A1. Notes and Sources

Tables

Chapter 1: Greenhouse gas emissions overview

Table 1. U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential, 1990-2009: Sources: Emissions: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009). Global warming potentials: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis: Errata (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2008), website http://ipcc-wg1.ucar.edu/wg1/Report/AR4WG1_Errata_2008-12-01.pdf.

Table 2. U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors, 1990-2009: Sources: Emissions: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009). GDP: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis, website www.bea.gov (November 2010).

Table 3. Distribution of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by end-use sector, 2009: Source: Estimates presented in this report. Notes: CO2 emissions by end-use sector are based on EIA's estimates of energy consumption by sector and on industrial process emissions. CO2 emissions from the electric power sector are allocated to the end-use sectors based on electricity sales to the sector. Non-CO2 emissions by end-use sector are allocated by direct emissions in those sectors plus indirect emissions from the electric power sector allocated by electricity sales. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

Table 4. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by region, 1990-2035: Sources: History: EIA, International Energy Statistics, website www.eia.gov/emeu/international; and U.S. data presented in this report. Projections: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Early Release Overview, DOE/EIA-0383ER(2011) (Washington, DC, December 2010), website www.eia.gov/aeo; and International Energy Outlook 2010, DOE/EIA-0484(2010) (Washington, DC, July 2010), Table A10, website www.eia.gov/oiaf/ieo. Note: Because newer U.S. values are used, the totals for North America, OECD, and the world in this report do not match the corresponding values in International Energy Outlook 2010.

Table 5. Greenhouse gases and 100-year net global warming potentials: See table footnotes.

Figures

Figure 1. U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by gas, 2009: Source: EIA estimates.

Figure 2. U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by major fuel, 2009: Source: EIA estimates.

Figure 3. U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector, 2009: Source: EIA estimates.

Figure 4. Annual changes in Kaya identity terms (GDP, Energy/GDP, CO2/Energy) and energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, 2005-2009: Sources: EIA estimates; and U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis, website www.bea.gov (GDP, November 2010).

Figure 5. Greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. economy: Source: Estimates presented in this report. Notes: CO2 emissions by end-use sector are based on EIA's estimates of energy consumption by sector and on industrial process emissions. CO2 emissions from the electric power sector are allocated to the end-use sectors based on electricity sales to the sector. Non-CO2 emissions by end-use sector are allocated by direct emissions in those sectors plus indirect emissions from the electric power sector allocated by electricity sales. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

Figure 6. World carbon dioxide emissions by region, 1990, 2007, 2025, and 2035: Sources: History: Energy Information Administration (EIA), International Energy Statistics, website www.eia.gov/emeu/international; and U.S. data presented in this report. Projections: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Early Release Overview, DOE/EIA-0383ER(2011) (Washington, DC, December 2010), website www.eia.gov/aeo; and International Energy Outlook 2010, DOE/EIA-0484(2010) (Washington, DC, July 2010), Table A10, website www.eia.gov/oiaf/ieo. Note: Because newer U.S. values are used, the totals for North America, OECD, and the world in this report do not match the corresponding values in International Energy Outlook 2010.

Figure 7. Regional shares of world carbon dioxide emissions, 1990, 2007, 2025, and 2035: Sources: History: Energy Information Administration (EIA), International Energy Statistics, website www.eia.gov/emeu/international; and U.S. data presented in this report. Projections: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Early Release Overview, DOE/EIA-0383ER(2011) (Washington, DC, December 2010), website www.eia.gov/aeo; and International Energy Outlook 2010, DOE/EIA-0484(2010) (Washington, DC, July 2010), Table A10, website www.eia.gov/oiaf/ieo. Note: Because newer U.S. values are used, the totals for North America, OECD, and the world in this report do not match the corresponding values in International Energy Outlook 2010.

Figure 8. U.S. emissions of black carbon by source, 2001 and 2020: Notes: Calculations based on PM2.5. Sources: M.A. Bahner, K.A. Weitz, A. Zapata, and B. DeAngelo, "Use of Black Carbon and Organic Carbon Inventories for Projections and Mitigation Analysis," presentation at 16th Annual International Emission Inventory Conference (Raleigh, NC, May 14-17, 2007), website www.epa.gov/ttn/chief/conference/ei16/session3/k.weitz.pdf; and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, "Reducing Particle Pollution," website www.epa.gov/oar/particlepollution/reducing.html. It is difficult to compare black carbon with conventional greenhouse gases because of uncertainty related to GWPs. Table 8 uses a 100-year GWP; however, a 20-year GWP may be more appropriate.

Figure 9. Annual change in U.S. carbon dioxide emissions, 1991-2009: Source: EIA estimates.


Chapter 2: Carbon dioxide emissions

Table 6. U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from energy and industry, 1990-2009: Sources: Emissions: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009).

Table 7. U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end-use sector, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009).

Table 8. U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from residential sector energy consumption, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009).

Table 9. U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from commercial sector energy consumption, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009).

Table 10. U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sector energy consumption, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009).

Table 11. U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from transportation sector energy consumption, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009).

Table 12. U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from electric power sector energy consumption, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009).

Table 13. U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from nonfuel uses of energy fuels, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009).

Table 14. U.S. carbon sequestration from nonfuel uses of energy fuels, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009).

Table 15. U.S. carbon dioxide emissions: adjustments for U.S. Territories and international bunker fuels, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009).

Table 16. U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from other sources, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009).

Figures

Figure 10. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions for selected sectors 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates.

Figure 11. Annual changes in U.S. heating degree-days and residential sector carbon dioxide emissions from direct fuel combustion, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates.

Figure 12. U.S. commercial sector carbon dioxide emissions and per capita income, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates.

Figure 13. U.S. industrial sector carbon dioxide emissions and major industrial fuel use, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates.

Figure 14. U.S. vehicle miles traveled and carbon dioxide emissions from gasoline and diesel transportation fuel use, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates.

Figure 15. U.S. electric power sector energy sales and losses and carbon dioxide emissions from primary fuel combustion, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates.

Figure 16. U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from other sources, 2009: Source: EIA estimates.


Chapter 3: Methane emissions

Table 17. U.S. methane emissions, 1990-2009: Sources: EIA, published and unpublished data used to produce Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009). Data in this table are revised from the data contained in Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008. Emissions calculations based on Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (2006 and revised 1996 guidelines), website www.ipcc-nggip.iges.or.jp/public/gl/invs6.html; and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2008, EPA 430-R-10-006 (Washington, DC, April 2010), website http://epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/usinventoryreport.html.

Table 18. U.S. methane emissions from energy sources, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009).

Table 19. U.S. methane emissions from agricultural sources, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009).

Table 20. U.S. methane emissions from waste management sources, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009).

Table 21. U.S. methane emissions from industrial process sources, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009).

Figures

Figure 17. U.S. methane emissions by source, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates.

Figure 18. U.S. methane emissions from energy sources, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates.

Figure 19. U.S. methane emissions from agriculture by source, 2009: Source: EIA estimates.

Figure 20. U.S. methane emissions from waste management by source, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates.

Figure 21. U.S. methane emissions from industrial processes by source, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates.


Chapter 4: Nitrous oxide emissions

Table 22. U.S. nitrous oxide emissions, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009). Emissions calculations based on Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (2006 and revised 1996 guidelines), website www.ipcc-nggip.iges.or.jp/public/gl/invs6.html; and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2008, EPA 430-R-10-006 (Washington, DC, April 2010), website http://epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/usinventoryreport.html.

Table 23. U.S. nitrous oxide emissions from agricultural sources, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009).

Table 24. U.S. nitrous oxide emissions from energy sources, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009).

Table 25. U.S. nitrous oxide emissions from industrial sources, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009).

Table 26. U.S. nitrous oxide emissions from waste management sources, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009).

Figures

Figure 22. U.S. nitrous oxide emissions by source, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates.

Figure 23. U.S. nitrous oxide emissions from agriculture by source, 2009: Source: EIA estimates.

Figure 24. U.S. nitrous oxide emissions from energy use by source, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates.

Figure 25. U.S. nitrous oxide emissions from industry by source, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates.

Figure 26. U.S. nitrous oxide emissions from waste management by source, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates.


Chapter 5: High-GWP gases

Table 27. U.S. emissions of hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride, 1990-2009: Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air and Radiation, website www.epa.gov/globalwarming/ (preliminary estimates, November 2009 for hydrofluorocarbons and other HFCs, PFCs/PFPEs; November 2008 for perfluorocarbons and sulfur hexafluoride).

Table 28. U.S. emissions of hydrofluorocarbons, 1990-2009: Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air and Radiation, website www.epa.gov/globalwarming/ (preliminary estimates, November 2009).

Table 29. U.S. emissions of perfluorocarbons, 1990-2009: Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air and Radiation, website www.epa.gov/globalwarming/ (estimates, November 2009). 2008 values are used as proxies for 2009.

Table 30. U.S. emissions of sulfur hexafluoride by source, 1990-2009: Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air and Radiation, website www.epa.gov/globalwarming/ (estimates, November 2009). 2008 values are used as proxies for 2009.

Figures

Figure 27. U.S. emissions of high-GWP gases, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates.

Figure 28. U.S. emissions of HFCs, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates.

Figure 29. U.S. emissions of PFCs, 1990-2009: Source: EIA estimates.

Figure 30. U.S. emissions of SF6 by source, 1990-2008: Source: EIA estimates.


Chapter 6: Land use

Table 31. Net U.S. carbon dioxide sequestration from land use, land use change, and forestry, 1990-2008: Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2008, EPA 430-R-10-006 (Washington, DC, April 2010), website http://epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/usinventoryreport.html.

Table 32. Net carbon dioxide sequestration in U.S. forests and harvested wood pools, 1990-2008: Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2008, EPA 430-R-10-006 (Washington, DC, April 2010), website http://epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/usinventoryreport.html.

Table 33. Net carbon dioxide sequestration in U.S. croplands and grasslands, 1990-2008: Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2008, EPA 430-R-10-006 (Washington, DC, April 2010), website http://epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/usinventoryreport.html.

Table 34. Net carbon dioxide sequestration in U.S. urban trees, yard trimmings, and food scraps, 1990-2008: Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2008, EPA 430-R-10-006 (Washington, DC, April 2010), website http://epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/usinventoryreport.html.

Table 35. Emissions of carbon dioxide from biofuel/bioenergy use by sector and fuel, 1990-2009: Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, January 2011 Monthly Energy Review (Washington, DC: January 31, 2011), website www.eia.gov/emeu/mer; and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 40 CFR: Protection of the Environment, Part 98—Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting, "Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 98—Default CO2 Emission Factors and High Heat Values for Various Types of Fuel," Federal Register, Vol. 74, No. 209 (October 30, 2009), p. 56410, website www.epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/downloads09/GHG-MRR-FinalRule.pdf.

Figures

Figure 31. U.S. carbon sequestration from land use, land use change, and forestry, 1990-2008: Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2008, EPA 430-R-10-006 (Washington, DC, April 2010), website http://epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/usinventoryreport.html.

Figure 32. Carbon sequestration in U.S. forest lands and harvested wood pools, 2008: Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2008, EPA 430-R-10-006 (Washington, DC, April 2010), website http://epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/usinventoryreport.html.

Figure 33. Carbon sequestration in U.S. croplands and grasslands, 1990-2008: Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2008, EPA 430-R-10-006 (Washington, DC, April 2010), website http://epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/usinventoryreport.html.

Figure 34. Carbon sequestration in U.S. urban trees, yard trimmings, and food scraps, 1990-2008: Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2008, EPA 430-R-10-006 (Washington, DC, April 2010), website http://epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/usinventoryreport.html.


Chapters



Data Tables

1 U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential, 1990-2009    
2 U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors, 1990-2009    
3 Distribution of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by end-use sector, 2009    
4 World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by region, 1990-2035    
5 Greenhouse gases and 100-year net global warming potentials    
6 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from energy and industry, 1990-2009    
7 U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end-use sector, 1990-2009    
8 U.S. carbon dioxide emission from residential sector enerhgy consumption, 1990-2009    
9 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from commercial sector energy consumption, 1990-2009    
10 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sector energy consumption, 1990-2009    

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