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Annual Energy Review

September 2012  PDF | previous editions
Release Date: September 27, 2012

Table 8.13 Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Programs, 1989-2010
Table 8.13  Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Programs, 1989-2010




Year
Actual Peakload Reductions 1

Energy Savings


Electric Utility Costs 4
Energy Efficiency 2 Load Management 3 Total
Megawatts Million Kilowatthours Thousand Dollars 5
1989 NA NA 12,463 14,672 872,935
1990 NA NA 13,704 20,458 1,177,457
1991 NA NA 15,619 24,848 1,803,773
1992 7,890 9,314 17,204 35,563 2,348,094
1993 10,368 12,701 23,069 45,294 2,743,533
1994 11,662 13,340 25,001 52,483 2,715,657
1995 13,212 16,347 29,561 57,421 2,421,284
1996 14,243 15,650 29,893 61,842 1,902,197
1997 13,327 11,958 25,284 56,406 1,636,020
1998 13,591 13,640 27,231 49,167 1,420,920
1999 13,452 13,003 26,455 50,563 1,423,644
2000 12,873 10,027 22,901 53,701 1,564,901
2001 13,027 11,928 24,955 53,936 1,630,286
2002 13,420 9,516 22,936 54,075 1,625,537
2003 13,581 9,323 22,904 50,265 1,297,210
2004 14,272 9,260 23,532 54,710 1,557,466
2005 15,351 10,359 25,710 59,897 1,921,352
2006 15,959 11,281 27,240 63,817 2,051,394
2007 17,710 12,543 30,253 68,992 2,523,117
2008 19,707 12,028 31,735 76,674 3,175,410
2009 19,766 11,916 31,682 77,907 3,593,750
2010 20,808 12,475 33,283 87,839 4,220,064
1The actual reduction in peak load reflects the change in demand for electricity that results from a utility
demand-side management (DSM) program that is in effect at the time that the utility experiences its actual
peak load as opposed to the potential installed peakload reduction capacity.  Differences between actual
and potential peak reduction result from changes in weather, economic activity, and other variable
conditions.
NA=Not available.  
2"Energy Efficiency" refers to programs that are aimed at reducing the energy used by specific end-use
devices and systems, typically without affecting the services provided.  These programs reduce overall
electricity consumption, often without explicit consideration for the timing of program-induced savings. 
Such savings are generally achieved by substituting technically more advanced equipment to produce the
same level of end-use services (e.g., lighting, heating, motor drive) with less electricity.  Examples include
high-efficiency appliances, efficient lighting programs, high-efficiency heating, ventilating, and air
conditioning systems or control modifications, efficient building design, advanced electric motor drives, and
heat recovery systems.
Note:  This table reports on the results of DSM programs operated by electric utilities.  The decrease
since 1998 in peakload reductions from DSM programs can be attributed in part to utilities cutting back or
terminating these programs due to industry deregulation.  Some State governments have created new
programs to promote DSM.  Examples include the "Energy $mart Loan Fund" administered by the New
York Energy Research and Development Authority and the "Efficiency Vermont" program of the Vermont
Public Service Board.  Data on energy savings attributable to these non-utility programs are not collected
by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).
3"Load Management" includes programs such as "Direct Load Control," "Interruptible Load Control,"
and, "Other Types" of DSM programs.  "Direct Load Control" refers to program activities that can interrupt
consumer load at the time of annual peak load by direct control of the utility system operator by interrupting
power supply to individual appliances or equipment on consumer premises.  This type of control usually
involves residential consumers.  "Interruptible Load Control" refers to program activities that, in accordance
with contractual arrangements, can interrupt consumer load at times of seasonal peak load by direct control
of the utility system operator or by action of the consumer at the direct request of the system operator.  It
usually involves commercial and industrial consumers.  In some instances, the load reduction may be
affected by direct action of the system operator (remote tripping) after notice to the consumer in accordance
with contractual provisions.  "Other Types" are programs that limit or shift peak loads from on-peak to
off-peak time periods, such as space heating and water heating storage systems.
Web Page:  For related information, see http://www.eia.gov/electricity/.
4Program costs consist of all costs associated with providing the various DSM programs or measures. 
The costs of DSM programs fall into these major categories: customer rebates/incentives,
administration/marketing/training, performance, incentives, research and evaluation, and other (most likely
indirect) costs.
Sources:  -  1989-1998-EIA, Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Utility Report."  -  1999 forward-EIA,
Electric Power Annual 2010 (November 2011), Tables 9.1, 9.6, and 9.7. 
5Prices are not adjusted for inflation.  See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary.  
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