Florida State Energy Profile



Florida Quick Facts

  • Florida is one of only four states with utility-scale electricity generation from solar thermal technologies.and is the only one east of the Rocky Mountains.
  • Florida was second only to Texas in 2017 in net electricity generation, and it is typically third in the nation in electricity consumption, behind Texas and California.
  • Florida accounts for almost 8% of the nation’s biomass-fueled electricity generation, more than any other state except California. 
  • In 2017, almost 87% of the natural gas delivered to consumers in Florida was used to generate electricity, and natural gas fueled more than two-thirds of Florida's net electricity generation.
  • Florida does not have any crude oil refineries or interstate pipelines and relies on petroleum products delivered by tanker and barge to Florida marine terminals, primarily at Jacksonville, Port Canaveral, Port Everglades, and Tampa.

Last Updated: September 20, 2018



Data

Last Update: October 18, 2018 | Next Update: November 15, 2018

+ EXPAND ALL
Energy Indicators  
Demography Florida Share of U.S. Period
Population 21.0 million 6.4% 2017  
Civilian Labor Force 10.2 million 6.3% Aug-18  
Economy Florida U.S. Rank Period
Gross Domestic Product $ 967.3 billion 4 2017  
Gross Domestic Product for the Manufacturing Sector $ 51,863 million 14 2017  
Per Capita Personal Income $ 46,858 27 2017  
Vehicle Miles Traveled 215,551 million miles 3 2016  
Land in Farms 9.5 million acres 30 2012  
Climate Florida U.S. Rank Period
Average Temperature 72.8 degrees Fahrenheit 1 2017  
Precipitation 58.5 inches 4 2017  
Prices  
Petroleum Florida U.S. Average Period find more
Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase -- $ 67.00 /barrel Jul-18  
Natural Gas Florida U.S. Average Period find more
City Gate $ 7.21 /thousand cu ft $ 4.67 /thousand cu ft Jul-18 find more
Residential $ 26.56 /thousand cu ft $ 17.88 /thousand cu ft Jul-18 find more
Coal Florida U.S. Average Period find more
Average Sales Price -- $ 30.57 /short ton 2016  
Delivered to Electric Power Sector $ 2.82 /million Btu $ 2.05 /million Btu Jul-18  
Electricity Florida U.S. Average Period find more
Residential 11.29 cents/kWh 13.12 cents/kWh Jul-18 find more
Commercial 8.92 cents/kWh 10.98 cents/kWh Jul-18 find more
Industrial 7.65 cents/kWh 7.34 cents/kWh Jul-18 find more
Reserves  
Reserves Florida Share of U.S. Period find more
Crude Oil (as of Dec. 31) 14 million barrels * 2016 find more
Expected Future Production of Dry Natural Gas (as of Dec. 31) 1 billion cu ft * 2016 find more
Expected Future Production of Natural Gas Plant Liquids 0 million barrels 0.0% 2016 find more
Recoverable Coal at Producing Mines -- -- 2016 find more
Rotary Rigs & Wells Florida Share of U.S. Period find more
Rotary Rigs in Operation 0 rigs 0.0% 2016  
Natural Gas Producing Wells 40 wells * 2017 find more
Capacity Florida Share of U.S. Period
Crude Oil Refinery Capacity (as of Jan. 1) 0 barrels/calendar day 0.0% 2017  
Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity 58,260 MW 5.4% Jul-18  
Supply & Distribution  
Production Florida Share of U.S. Period find more
Total Energy 552 trillion Btu 0.7% 2016 find more
Crude Oil 164 thousand barrels * Jul-18 find more
Natural Gas - Marketed 709 million cu ft * 2017 find more
Coal -- -- 2016 find more
Total Utility-Scale Net Electricity Generation Florida Share of U.S. Period find more
Total Net Electricity Generation 24,126 thousand MWh 5.9% Jul-18  
Utility-Scale Net Electricity Generation (share of total) Florida U.S. Average Period
Petroleum-Fired 0.1 % 0.2 % Jul-18 find more
Natural Gas-Fired 72.6 % 40.3 % Jul-18 find more
Coal-Fired 11.7 % 28.2 % Jul-18 find more
Nuclear 11.1 % 17.7 % Jul-18 find more
Renewables 2.7 % 13.0 % Jul-18  
Stocks Florida Share of U.S. Period find more
Motor Gasoline (Excludes Pipelines) 581 thousand barrels 3.4% Jul-18  
Distillate Fuel Oil (Excludes Pipelines) 2,690 thousand barrels 2.7% Jul-18 find more
Natural Gas in Underground Storage -- -- Jul-18 find more
Petroleum Stocks at Electric Power Producers 4,595 thousand barrels 17.6% Jul-18 find more
Coal Stocks at Electric Power Producers 3,604 thousand tons 3.3% Jul-18 find more
Fueling Stations Florida Share of U.S. Period
Motor Gasoline 6,200 stations 5.6% 2016  
Liquefied Petroleum Gases 144 stations 4.4% 2017  
Electricity 862 stations 5.5% 2017  
Ethanol 66 stations 2.3% 2017  
Compressed Natural Gas and Other Alternative Fuels 31 stations 2.4% 2017  
Consumption & Expenditures  
Summary Florida U.S. Rank Period
Total Consumption 4,240 trillion Btu 3 2016 find more
Total Consumption per Capita 205 million Btu 46 2016 find more
Total Expenditures $ 52,155 million 3 2016 find more
Total Expenditures per Capita $ 2,525 50 2016 find more
by End-Use Sector Florida Share of U.S. Period
Consumption
    »  Residential 1,214 trillion Btu 6.1% 2016 find more
    »  Commercial 1,015 trillion Btu 5.6% 2016 find more
    »  Industrial 492 trillion Btu 1.6% 2016 find more
    »  Transportation 1,518 trillion Btu 5.5% 2016 find more
Expenditures
    »  Residential $ 14,089 million 5.9% 2016 find more
    »  Commercial $ 10,006 million 5.6% 2016 find more
    »  Industrial $ 3,645 million 2.1% 2016 find more
    »  Transportation $ 24,415 million 5.4% 2016 find more
by Source Florida Share of U.S. Period
Consumption
    »  Petroleum 320.1 million barrels 4.4% 2016 find more
    »  Natural Gas 1,382.3 billion cu ft 5.0% 2016 find more
    »  Coal 18.2 million short tons 2.5% 2016 find more
Expenditures
    »  Petroleum $ 27,024 million 4.9% 2016 find more
    »  Natural Gas $ 6,125 million 4.8% 2016 find more
    »  Coal $ 1,290 million 4.1% 2016 find more
Consumption for Electricity Generation Florida Share of U.S. Period find more
Petroleum NM NM Jul-18 find more
Natural Gas 130,529 million cu ft 10.5% Jul-18 find more
Coal 1,261 thousand short tons 2.0% Jul-18 find more
Energy Source Used for Home Heating (share of households) Florida U.S. Average Period
Natural Gas 4.6 % 48.0 % 2017  
Fuel Oil 0.1 % 4.7 % 2017  
Electricity 92.3 % 39.0 % 2017  
Propane 0.8 % 4.7 % 2017  
Other/None 2.1 % 3.6 % 2017  
Environment  
Renewable Energy Capacity Florida Share of U.S. Period find more
Total Renewable Energy Electricity Net Summer Capacity 2,403 MW 1.1% Jul-18  
Ethanol Plant Operating Capacity 0 million gal/year 0.0% 2018  
Renewable Energy Production Florida Share of U.S. Period find more
Utility-Scale Hydroelectric Net Electricity Generation 16 thousand MWh 0.1% Jul-18  
Utility-Scale Solar, Wind, and Geothermal Net Electricity Generation 220 thousand MWh 0.9% Jul-18  
Utility-Scale Biomass Net Electricity Generation 404 thousand MWh 7.3% Jul-18  
Distributed (Small-Scale) Solar Photovoltaic Generation 39 thousand MWh 1.2% Jul-18  
Ethanol Production 0 Thousand Barrels 0.0% 2016  
Renewable Energy Consumption Florida U.S. Rank Period find more
Renewable Energy Consumption as a Share of State Total 6.9 % 32 2016  
Ethanol Consumption 20,105 thousand barrels 3 2016  
Total Emissions Florida Share of U.S. Period find more
Carbon Dioxide 231.0 million metric tons 4.4% 2015  
Electric Power Industry Emissions Florida Share of U.S. Period find more
Carbon Dioxide 110,388 thousand metric tons 5.7% 2016  
Sulfur Dioxide 59 thousand metric tons 3.3% 2016  
Nitrogen Oxide 70 thousand metric tons 4.3% 2016  

Analysis

Last Updated: September 20, 2018

Overview

The Florida peninsula extends 447 miles south from the Georgia border to the Florida Keys and has substantial biomass resources, some oil and natural gas reserves, and significant solar energy potential.1,2,3 The warm waters of the Gulf Stream wrap around the state's coastline, which is more than 1,100 miles long. The Gulf Stream moderates the state's climate but also makes Florida one of the most humid states in the nation, with frequent summer thunderstorms and occasional devastating hurricanes.4,5 Florida's northern boundary stretches 361 miles from the Atlantic Ocean to the Florida Panhandle's western boundary with Alabama.6 The Panhandle contains Florida's largest crude oil and natural gas field.7 Although the state is able to supplement the small amounts of fossil fuels it produces with its renewable resources, energy production in Florida is substantially lower than the state's consumption.8,9,10

Florida is one of the largest energy-consuming states, but its per capita energy consumption is among the lowest.

Until the 20th century, the state was largely rural and sparsely populated, but Florida has been one of the fastest growing states in recent decades, in part because air conditioning became widely available.11,12 The fourth-largest state by population in the 2010 U.S. Census, Florida became the third-most populated state in 2014.13,14 With its large population, Florida is also the third-largest energy-consuming state.15 The transportation sector leads state end-use energy demand, followed by the residential sector, where more Florida homes—19 out of 20—use air conditioning than use heating systems.16,17 Florida's industrial sector consumes about one-third as much energy as the state's transportation sector.18 Partly because industrial sector energy consumption is relatively low, Florida ranks among the 10 lowest states in per capita energy consumption.19

Electricity

Florida is one of the largest producers of electricity in the United States, second only to Texas. Natural gas fuels more than two-thirds of Florida's net electricity generation.20 Six of the state's 10 largest power plants by capacity and 7 of the largest 10 by generation are natural gas-fired.21 Although petroleum-fired power plants provided less than one-tenth of Florida's generating capacity in 2017, petroleum remains an important backup fuel source. About three-fourths of the state's natural gas-fired power plants can switch to petroleum fuels in the event of disruptions in the natural gas supply.22 Coal fueled the largest share of electricity generation in Florida until 2003, when its contribution was surpassed by that of natural gas. In 2017, less than one-sixth of Florida's net electricity generation was coal-fired, down from more than one-third of state generation in 2001.23,24

Two nuclear power stations on Florida's Atlantic Coast produce most of the state's remaining net electricity generation.25,26 A third nuclear power plant, on the state's Gulf coast, ceased generating power in 2009 and the licensee is considering active decommissioning.27 Two proposed nuclear reactors at an existing nuclear power station south of Miami on Florida's Atlantic Coast have received licenses. However, plans have been put on hold as the utility reconsiders because of increased construction costs and competition from other lower-cost fuels.28 Almost all of the state's recent and planned capacity additions are natural gas-fueled, and most of the rest will use renewable resources, primarily solar.29

Although Florida is one of the top producers of electricity in the nation, the state does not produce enough electricity to meet current state power demand, and electricity demand in Florida is expected to increase.30,31,32 The residential sector consumes more than half of electricity used in Florida, and the commercial sector accounts for most of the rest.33 More than 9 in 10 Florida households use electricity as their primary energy source for home heating, and an even larger number use electricity for air conditioning.34,35 Florida's per capita residential retail sales of electricity are among the highest one-fifth of states, but total retail sales of electricity per capita in the state are below the national average because electricity sales to the industrial sector are relatively low.36,37

Petroleum

Florida has less than 0.1% of the nation's crude oil reserves and production.38,39 Geologists believe there may be substantial additional reserves in federal waters in the Gulf of Mexico, off Florida's western coast.40 However, Florida enacted a drilling ban for state waters in 1990, and, in 2006, Congress enacted a restriction on oil and gas leasing of federal offshore areas within 125 miles of Florida's Gulf of Mexico coast until at least 2022. Federal law also gives priority use of much of the area to the military for training.41,42 Exploration companies spent more than 40 years drilling dry holes in Florida's Panhandle and in the southwest around the Everglades before finally striking oil in 1943.43 Annual production from those two regions peaked at more than 47 million barrels in 1978 with the development of Jay Field in the Panhandle. However, statewide production dropped to less than 2 million barrels annually by 2017.44,45

Florida does not have any crude oil refineries or interstate petroleum pipelines and relies on petroleum products delivered by tanker and barge to Florida marine terminals, primarily at Jacksonville, Port Canaveral, Port Everglades, and Tampa.46,47,48 Petroleum products, including residual fuel oil, jet fuel, motor gasoline and motor gasoline blending components, low-sulfur distillate, and asphalt, arrive in Florida ports from around the world. Ethanol and biomass-based diesel imports also arrive in the state, mainly from South America.49 An intrastate pipeline transports petroleum products from Tampa across central Florida to Orlando.50

Tourism and traffic through busy international airports drive heavy consumption of transportation fuels.

Almost nine-tenths of Florida's petroleum consumption occurs in the transportation sector, and most of the rest is used in the industrial and commercial sectors. Only a very small amount of petroleum is used by the residential sector. Fewer than 1% of homes use petroleum products for heating.51,52 In part because of Florida's large population, tourist industry, and the heavy passenger and cargo traffic through its international airports, state demand for motor gasoline and jet fuel is among the highest in the United States.53,54,55 Florida does not require that motor gasoline be blended with ethanol, and federal requirements for cleaner-burning summer gasoline blends in Florida's urban areas were lifted in 2014.56,57 Until 2007, petroleum typically provided between one-fifth and one-tenth of Florida's net electricity generation, and the state produced more power from that fuel than any other state.58,59,60 However, electric utilities have replaced older petroleum-fired units with natural gas-fired units, and, since 2011, petroleum and petroleum coke fueled 1.5% or less of Florida's net electricity generation.61,62

Natural gas

Florida has no significant natural gas reserves and only a small amount of natural gas production, all from the same fields that produce crude oil.63 Almost all of the state's natural gas production comes from the Jay Field in the Florida Panhandle, where natural gas withdrawals are used primarily to repressure oil reservoirs to maintain or improve oil production.64 As a result, less than one-fifth of the state's limited natural gas gross withdrawals are marketed.65 Florida's natural gas production peaked in the late 1970s. By 2009, production had fallen to less than 1% of the 1978 record high.66 Despite a brief increase in production early in the current decade, natural gas production is now less than 7% of peak production. Geologists believe additional economically recoverable natural gas deposits may lie offshore in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, but Florida has banned exploratory drilling in state waters in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, and the federal government has placed a moratorium on exploration in federal waters in the eastern Gulf until 2022.67,68,69

Florida receives nearly all of its natural gas supplies from the Gulf Coast region via several major interstate pipelines. Pipelines entering Florida bring natural gas into the state through Alabama and Georgia.70,71,72,73 One subsea pipeline runs 745 miles across the Gulf of Mexico, forming a direct link from Mississippi and Alabama to central Florida.74 Some of the natural gas that enters Florida from Georgia comes from the Elba Island liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal.75 Plans for an offshore LNG import terminal and pipeline near Port Manatee were approved in 2009. However, because U.S. natural gas production increased substantially since 2009, those plans were abandoned in 2016.76 Except for recent deliveries of small amounts of containerized LNG to Barbados and Bermuda, Florida consumes all of the natural gas it receives.77,78

Most of Florida's natural gas is consumed for electric power generation. The industrial sector is the second-largest natural gas-consuming sector in the state, but it uses less than one-tenth as much natural gas as the electric power sector. Only about 1% of the natural gas delivered to consumers in Florida goes to the residential sector, where fewer than 1 in 20 households use natural gas as a primary home heating fuel.79,80

Coal

Florida does not have any coal reserves or production.81,82 Coal arrives in the state from several states and from overseas. Domestic supplies for Florida's coal-fired electricity generating plants are delivered by railroad and barge, mostly from Illinois, Kentucky, and Indiana.83 Tampa is the nation's leading coal import port, receiving coal primarily from Colombia in South America.84,85 Almost all coal consumed in the state is used for electricity generation.86 Coal-fired electricity generation in Florida has decreased, and coal consumption in the electric power sector has fallen from more than 27 million tons in 2006 to less than 17 million tons in 2017.87,88,89

Renewable energy

Florida obtains a relatively small portion of its energy from renewable resources.90 Renewable energy fuels less than 3% of Florida's electricity generation.91 Most of the state's renewable electricity generation comes from biomass, with the remainder coming from several solar energy facilities scattered around Florida and from two hydroelectricity generators in the Florida Panhandle.92,93

Biomass, including agricultural and municipal wastes, provides the largest share of Florida’s renewably sourced power.

Florida accounts for almost 8% of the nation's biomass-fueled electricity generation, more than any other state except California.94 The state's biomass resources include municipal waste, sugarcane waste (bagasse), citrus pulp, and other plant and animal agricultural residues, as well as yard waste and woody biomass. Florida has many utility-scale biomass-fueled electricity generating facilities. Several are combined-heat-and-power facilities at industrial sites, including food processing and chemical facilities that can use biomass-based fuels.95,96 Many sugarcane mills get their energy from burning bagasse and can burn other biomass wastes as well.97 Florida also has three operating biodiesel plants and two pellet plants.98,99

In 2017, utility-scale and distributed (customer-sited, small-scale) solar facilities together contributed slightly less than one-fifth of Florida's renewable-sourced net generation.100 Florida was eighth in the nation in installed utility-scale and distributed solar PV capacity in mid-2018, with slightly more than 1,893 megawatts.101 Several large solar PV facilities came online in 2018.102 Florida is one of only four states with utility-scale electricity generation from solar thermal technologies that concentrate sunlight to produce the high temperature heat needed to generate electricity.103 The Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center in Martin County, Florida, a 75-megawatt concentrating solar power facility, is combined with a 1,100-megawatt combined-cycle natural gas generating plant, and it is the only concentrating solar thermal generating facility east of the Rocky Mountains.104 However, the amount of electricity generation from Florida's single small solar thermal facility was less than 1% of the nation's total in 2017.105

Florida has few other renewable energy assets. The state has no significant wind resources and no installed utility-scale wind capacity, although some wind power components are manufactured in Florida.106,107,108 Potential for a small amount of additional hydroelectric generation exists in the northern part of the state.109

Florida does not have a renewable energy portfolio standard, but it does have state and local incentives, tax credits, and loan programs for certain renewable energy technologies.110,111 The state has adopted net metering and interconnection rules for qualifying customer-sited renewable energy facilities.112

Endnotes

1 U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Electric Power Monthly (February 2018), Table 1.10.B, 1.11.B, 1.15.B.
2 U.S. EIA, Crude Oil Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production, Proved Reserves, as of December 31, 2011-16.
3 Solar Energy Industries Association, Solar Spotlight-Florida (June 2018).
4 Zimmerman, Kim Ann, "What is the Gulf Stream?" Live Science (January 15, 2013).
5 Griffin, Melissa, "Florida ... The ‘Liquid' Sunshine State," Community Collaborative Rain, Hail & Snow Network, ‘State Climates' Series, accessed August 19, 2018.
6 State of Florida, Florida Quick Facts, Florida Geography, accessed August 19, 2018.
7 Jacobs, Nicole, "Florida: Sunshine, Oranges, Palm Trees…And Oil," Energy in Depth (October 19, 2015).
8 U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Crude Oil Production, Annual, 2012-17.
9 U.S. EIA, Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production, Gross Withdrawals, Annual, 2012-17.
10 U.S. EIA, State Energy Production Estimates 1960 Through 2016, Table 3, Total Primary Energy Production and Total Energy Consumption Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2016.
11 Hobbes, Frank, and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, U.S. Census Bureau, CENSR-4 (November 2002), p. 7, 22, 26.
12 Briney, Amanda, "The Sunbelt, The Sunbelt of the Southern and Western United States," ThoughtCo., updated January 24, 2018.
13 U.S. Bureau of the Census, Population Distribution and Change: 2000 to 2010, p. 2.
14 U.S. Census Bureau, Data, State Population Totals and Components of Change: 2010-2017, Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for the United States, Regions, States, and Puerto Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2017 (NST-EST2017-01).
15 U.S. EIA, State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2016, DOE/EIA-0214(2016) (June 2018), Table C10, Total Consumption Estimates by End Use Sector, 2016.
16 U.S. EIA, Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), 2015 RECS Survey Data, Table HC7.8, Air conditioning in homes in the South and West regions, 2015, South Atlantic, and Table HC6.8, Space heating in homes in the South and West regions, 2015, South Atlantic.
17 U.S. EIA, Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), 2009 RECS Survey Data, Table HC7.10, Air conditioning in South Region, divisions, and states, and Table HC6.10, Space heating in South Region, divisions, and states.
18 U.S. EIA, State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2016, DOE/EIA-0214(2016) (June 2018), Table C10, Total Consumption Estimates by End-Use Sector, 2016.
19 U.S. EIA, State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2016, DOE/EIA-0214(2016) (June 2018), Table C13, Energy Consumption Estimates per Capita by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2016.
20 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Monthly (February 2018), Tables 1.3.B, 1.7.B.
21 U.S. EIA, Florida Electricity Profile 2016, Table 2A, Ten largest plants by capacity, 2016, and Table 2B, Ten largest plants by generation, 2016.
22 U.S. EIA, Electricity, Form EIA-860 detailed data, 2017 Form EIA-860 Data, Schedule 3, 'Generator Data' (Operable Units Only).
23 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Monthly (February 2018), Tables 1.3.B, 1.4.B.
24 U.S. EIA, Florida Electricity Profile 2016, Table 5, Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2016.
25 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Florida, updated October 5, 2016.
26 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Monthly (February 2018), Tables 1.3.B, 1.9.B.
27 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant, updated July 19, 2018.
28 Walton, Robert, "Nuclear regulators to license two new reactors at Turkey Point facility," Utility Dive (April 9, 2018).
29 U.S. EIA, Electricity, Form EIA-860 detailed data, 2017 Form EIA-860 Data, Schedule 3, 'Generator Data' (Operable Units Only), and Schedule 3, 'Generator Data' (Proposed Units Only).
30 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Monthly (February 2018), Tables 1.3.B.
31 Florida Reliability Coordinating Council, 2018 Regional Load & Resource Plan FRCC-MS-PL-191, Version: 1, p. 3-4.
32 U.S. EIA, Florida Electricity Profile 2016, Table 10, Supply and disposition of electricity, 1990-2016, Florida.
33 U.S. EIA, U.S. States, Table F21, Electricity Consumption Estimates, 2016.
34 U.S. Census Bureau, American FactFinder, Florida, Table B25040, House Heating Fuel, 2016 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates.
35 U.S. EIA, Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), 2009 RECS Survey Data, Air Conditioning, Table HC7.10.
36 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Monthly (February 2018), Tables 1.3.B, 1.10.B, 1.11.B.
37 U.S. Census Bureau, Data, State Population Totals and Components of Change: 2010-2017, Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for the United States, Regions, States, and Puerto Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2017 (NST-EST2017-01).
38 U.S. EIA, Crude Oil Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production, Proved Reserves, as of December 31, 2011-16.
39 U.S. EIA, Crude Oil Production, Annual, 2012-17.
40 U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Assessment of Undiscovered Technically Recoverable Oil and Gas Resources of the Nation's Outer Continental Shelf, 2011, BOEM Fact Sheet RED-2011-01a (November 2011), p. 3.
41 Online Sunshine, The 2018 Florida Statutes, Title XXVIII, 377.242, accessed August 20, 2018.
42 U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Areas Under Restriction, accessed August 20, 2018.
43 American Oil & Gas Historical Society, "First Florida Oil Well," accessed August 20, 2018.
44 Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Water Resource Management, Oil and Gas Program, Field Production Data, Field Production Graphs 2017, updated March 6, 2018.
45 U.S. EIA, Florida Field Production of Crude Oil, Annual, 1981-2017.
46 U.S. EIA, Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries, Total Number of Operable Refineries, 2013-18.
47 U.S. EIA, U.S. Energy Mapping System, Petroleum Refinery, Crude Oil Pipeline, Petroleum Product Pipeline, and HGL Pipeline Map Layers, accessed September 12, 2018.
48 U.S. EIA, Petroleum and Other Liquids, Company Level Imports, June 2017 to May 2018.
49 U.S. EIA, Petroleum and Other Liquids, Company Level Imports, February through August, 2017, October, 2017, and December 2017.
50 Kinder Morgan, Products Pipelines, Central Florida Pipeline Company, accessed August 20, 2018.
51 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table F15: Total Petroleum Consumption Estimates, 2016.
52 U.S. Census Bureau, American FactFinder, Florida, Table B25040, 2016 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates.
53 Airports Council International-North America, Airport Traffic Reports, 2016 North American (ACI-NA) Top 50 airports (includes Passenger, Cargo and Movements), accessed August 20, 2018.
54 U.S. EIA, State Energy Data System, Table F3: Motor Gasoline Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2016.
55 U.S. EIA, U.S. States, Table F2: Jet Fuel Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2016.
56 McLaughlin, Tom, "Rick Scott Signs Ethanol Bill Repealing Required Percentage Statute," The Huffington Post, updated August 1, 2013.
57 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Gasoline Standards, Relaxation of Summer Gasoline Volatility Standard for Florida and the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill Area (Triangle Area) and the Greensboro/Winston-Salem/High Point Area (Triad Area) in North Carolina, updated August 2, 2018.
58 U.S. EIA, Florida Electricity Profile 2016, Table 5, Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2016.
59 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Monthly, DOE/EIA-0226 (2006/03) (March 2006), Tables 1.6.B, 1.8.B, 1.9.B.
60 U.S. EIA, Electricity Browser, All sectors, All states, Petroleum liquids, 2001-17.
61 U.S. EIA, Electricity, Form EIA-860 detailed data, 2017 Form EIA-860 Data - Schedule 3, 'Generator Data' (Operable Units Only) and (Retired & Canceled Units Only).
62 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Monthly (February 2018), Tables 1.3.B, 1.5.B, 1.6.B.
63 U.S. EIA, Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of December 31, Florida, Annual, 2011-16.
64 Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Water Resource Management, Oil and Gas Program, State Production Data, Florida Production Data 2000 to 2018, updated August 8, 2018.
65 U.S. EIA, Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production, Florida, Annual-Million Cubic Feet, 2011-16.
66 U.S. EIA, Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals, 1971-2015.
67 U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Assessment of Undiscovered Technically Recoverable Oil and Gas Resources of the Nation's Outer Continental Shelf, 2011, BOEM Fact Sheet RED-2011-01a (November 2011), p. 3.
68 Online Sunshine, The 2018 Florida Statutes, Title XXVIII, 377.242, accessed August 20, 2018.
69 U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Areas Under Restriction, accessed September 12, 2018.
70 U.S. EIA, International and Interstate Movements of Natural Gas by State, Florida, Annual., 2011-16.
71 Gulf South Pipeline, Overview, accessed August 21, 2018.
72 "Sabal Trail Pipeline Begins Service," Gas Compression Magazine (July 13, 2017).
73 Kinder Morgan, Natural Gas Pipelines and Facilities, updated August 22, 2013.
74 Gulfstream Natural Gas System, About Gulfstream, accessed August 21, 2018.
75 Kinder Morgan, Natural Gas Pipelines, Southern Natural Gas, accessed August 21, 2018.
76 Johnson, Matt, "U.S. Natural Gas Market Kills Port Manatee Pipeline Project," Bradenton Herald (January 4, 2016).
77 U.S. EIA, International and Interstate Movements of Natural Gas by State, Florida, Annual., 2011-16.
78 U.S. Department of Energy, "U.S. Department of Energy Finalizes Rule to Expedite Approval for Small-Scale Natural Gas Exports," Press Release (July 25, 2018).
79 U.S. EIA, Natural Gas Consumption by End Use, Florida, Annual, 2012-17.
80 U.S. Census Bureau, American FactFinder, Florida, Table B25040, House Heating Fuel, 2016 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates.
81 U.S. EIA, Annual Coal Report 2016 (November 2017), Table 15, Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve Base by Mining Method, 2016.
82 U.S. EIA, Annual Coal Report 2016 (November 2017), Table 1, Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Mine Type, 2016 and 2015.
83 U.S. EIA, Annual Coal Distribution Report 2016 (November 2017), Florida Table DS-9, Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination State, 2016.
84 U.S. EIA, "U.S. coal exports and imports both decline in 2016 as U.S. remains net coal exporter," Today in Energy (March 14, 2017).
85 U.S. EIA, Quarterly Coal Report, October-December 2017 (April 2018), Table 20, Coal Imports by Customs District.
86 U.S. EIA, Annual Coal Report 2016 (November 2017), Table 26, U.S. Coal Consumption by End Use Sector, Census Division, and State, 2016 and 2015.
87 U.S. EIA, Florida Electricity Profile 2016, Table 5, Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2016.
88 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Monthly, DOE/EIA-0226 (2007/03) (March 2007), Table 2.5.B.
89 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Monthly (February 2018), Table 2.8.B.
90 U.S. EIA, U.S. States, Table C1, Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2016.
91 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Monthly (February 2018), Table 5.4.B.
92 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Monthly (February 2018), Table 1.3.B, 1.10.B, 1.11.B, 1.15.B, 1.17.B, 1.18.B.
93 U.S. EIA, Florida Profile Overview, Biomass, Solar, and Hydroelectric Power Plant Map Layers, accessed August 23, 2018.
94 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Monthly (February 2018), Table 1.10.B, 1.11.B, 1.15.B.
95 U.S. Department of Energy Combined Heat and Power Installation Database, Combined Heat and Power Installations in Florida , updated December 31, 2017.
96 U.S. EIA, Electricity, Form EIA-860 detailed data, 2017 Form EIA-860 Data, Schedule 3, 'Generator Data' (Operable Units Only).
97 Florida Sugar Farmers: Proud Partners in the Everglades Restoration, U.S. Sugar Corporation and Florida Crystals (August 1998), p. 17-18.
98 "U.S. Biodiesel Plants, Operational," Biodiesel Magazine, updated December 13, 2017.
99 "U.S. Pellet Plants, Operational," Biomass Magazine, updated July 19, 2018.
100 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Monthly (February 2017), Tables 1.10.B, 1.15.B, 1.17.B, 1.18.B, 6.2.B.
101 Solar Energy Industries Association, Solar Spotlight-Florida (June 2018).
102 Florida Power & Light Co., FPL Solar Energy Centers, accessed August 23, 2018.
103 U.S. EIA, Solar Explained, Solar Thermal Power Plants, accessed September 12, 2018.
104 National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power Projects, Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center, updated January 25, 2013.
105 U.S. EIA, Electric Power Monthly (February 2018), Table 1.18.B.
106 U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, WINDExchange, Wind Energy in Florida, accessed August 23, 2018.
107 American Wind Energy Association, Wind Energy in Florida, accessed August 23, 2018.
108 U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, WINDExchange, U.S. Offshore 90-Meter Wind Resource Potential, accessed September 12, 2018.
109 Kao, Shih-Chieh, et al., New Stream-reach Development: A Comprehensive Assessment of Hydropower Energy Potential in the United States, U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (April 2014), p. 44-45.
110 Durkay, Jocelyn, State Renewable Portfolio Standards and Goals, National Conference of State Legislators (July 20, 2018).
111 NC Clean Energy Technology Center, DSIRE, Programs, Florida, Financial Incentives, accessed August 23, 2018.
112 NC Clean Energy Technology, DSIRE, Florida, Net Metering, updated November 9, 2015.


Other Resources

Energy-Related Regions and Organizations

Other Websites


Email suggestions for additional Florida website resources to: .

map