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Figure 5.1. Total Primary Transportation Energy, Gross Domestic Purchases, and Crude Oil Price Indices, 1977 to 1993

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          Notes: U.S. Gross Domestic Purchases used to develop the index are in constant 1987 dollars. Crude Oil Domestic First Purchase Price Index is in constant 1987 dollars per barrel, U.S. average.
          Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Annual Energy Review 1993, Tables 2.1 and 5.17. U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis, National Trade Data Bank, National Income and Product Accounts, Quantity series.

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Figure 5.2. Percent of Total Primary Energy Consumption in the Transportation Sector by Transportation Mode, 1992

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          Notes: Motorcycles account for less than .01 percent of total energy consumption in the transportation sector. Off-Highway includes construction and farming. Electricity losses are included.
        Source: U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Transportation Energy Data Book (ORNL-6798), Edition 14, Table 2.9.

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Figure 5.3. Total Site Energy Consumption in the Transportation Sector, 1985, 1988, and 1991

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          Notes: Other Modes include military, off-highway (construction and farming), and recreational boats. The methodologies used to separate air passenger and freight and to calculate site electricity for rail and pipeline are located in the transportation section in Appendix A.
        Sources: U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Transportation Energy Data Book, Editions 11 and 14 and unpublished 1985 data from ORNL. Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, National Transportation Statistics, September 1993, Tables 1, 4, and 6. Eno Transportation Foundation Inc., Transportation in America 1994, pp. 44 and 49.

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Figure 5.4. Change in Total Site Energy Consumption in the Transportation Sector, by Transportation Mode, 1985 to 1991

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          Notes: Other Modes include military, off-highway (construction and farming), and recreational boats. The methodology used to separate air passenger and freight is presented in the transportation section in Appendix A.
        Sources: U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Transportation Energy Data Book, Editions 11 and 14 and unpublished 1985 data from ORNL. U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, National Transportation Statistics Tables 1, 4, and 6 (September 1993). Eno Transportation Foundation Inc., Transportation in America 1994, pp. 44 and 49.

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Figure 5.5. Site Energy Consumption for Passenger Travel by Passenger Mode, 1985, 1988, and 1991

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          Notes: Mass Transit includes buses and passenger rail. Derivation of these numbers are described in the transportation section in Appendix A.
        Sources: U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Transportation Energy Data Book, Editions 8 Table 1.5, Editions 11 and 14, Table 2.6 and unpublished 1985 data from ORNL.

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Figure 5.6. Change in Site Energy Consumption for Passenger Travel, by Passenger Model, 1985 to 1991

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          Notes: Mass Transit includes buses and passenger rail.
        Sources: U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Transportation Energy Data Book, Editions 11 and 14, and unpublished 1985 data from ORNL. Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, National Transportation Statistics (September 1993), Table 1, 4, and 6. Eno Transportation Foundation Inc., Transportation in America 1994, pp. 44 and 49.

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Figure 5.7. Demand Indicator, Vehicle-Miles Traveled by Passenger Mode, 1985, 1988, and 1991

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          Notes: No change was reported for General Aviation 1985-1988. Mass transit include buses and passenger rail.
        Sources: U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau Transportation Statistics, National Transportation Statistics, Annual Report (September 1993), Tables 5 and 6.

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Figure 5.8. Change in Demand indicator, Vehicle-Miles Traveled by Passenger Mode 1985 to 1991

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          Notes: No change was reported for General Aviation 1985-1988. Mass transit include buses and passenger rail.
        Sources: U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau Transportation Statistics, National Transportation Statistics, Annual Report (September 1993), Tables 5 and 6.

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Figure 5.9. Change in Occupancy by Passenger Mode, 1985 to 1991

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           Note: Mass transit include buses and passenger rail.
        Sources: U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau Transportation Statistics, National Transportation Statistics, Annual Report (September 1993), Tables 5 and 6.

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Figure 5.10. Demand Indicator, Passenger-Miles Traveled by Passenger Mode, 1985, 1988, and 1991

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          Notes: Mass Transit includes buses and passenger rail.
       Sources: U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, National Transportation Statistics Annual Report(September 1993), Table 6.

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Figure 5.11. Change in Demand Indicator, Passenger-Miles Traveled by Passenger Mode, 1985, 1988, and 1991

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          Notes: Mass Transit includes buses and passenger rail.
       Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, Public Use Files. U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, National Transportation Statistics Annual Report(September 1993), Table 6.

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Figure 5.12. Energy-Intensity Indicator for Household Vehicles, by Vehicle Type and Age, 1985, 1988, and 1991

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          Note: Minivan classification not applicable in 1985.
        Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, 1985, 1988, and 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Surveys, Public-Use Data Files.

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Figure 5.13. Change in the Energy-Intensity Indicator, 1985 to 1991

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          Notes: Minivan classification not applicable in 1985. Percent changes are based on unrounded numbers.
          Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, 1985 and 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Surveys, Public-Use Data Files.

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Figure 5.14. Characteristics of Household Vehicles, 1985 and 1991

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          Notes: Minivans were not applicable in 1985. In 1985 all vans were considered large. Sport-utility in 1991 applies to jeep-like in 1985.
        Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, 1985 and 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Surveys, Public-Use Data Files.

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Figure 5.15. Energy-Intensity Indicator by Passenger Transportation Mode, 1985, 1988, and 1991

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          Notes: Mass Transit includes buses and passenger rail. Derivation of these estimates are described in the transportation section of Appendix A.
        Sources: U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Transportation Energy Data Book, Editions 11 and 14, Table 2.6 and unpublished 1985 data from ORNL. U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, National Transportation Statistics, Annual Report (September 1993), Table 6.

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Figure 5.16. Change in the Energy-Intensity Indicator by Passenger Transportation Mode, 1985, 1988, and 1991

 

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          Notes: Mass Transit includes buses and passenger rail. Derivation of these estimates are described in the Transportation section of Appendix A.
        Sources: U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Transportation Energy Data Book, Editions 11 and 14, Table 2.6, and unpublished 1985 data from ORNL. U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, National Transportation Statistics, Annual Report (September 1993), Table 6.

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Figure 5.17. Freight Transportation Site Energy Consumption by Freight Mode, 1985, 1988, and 1991

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          Notes: In this graph, the share of oil pipeline in total freight consumption was less than 1 percent. Energy for moving water and natural gas is excluded. Data collection for small package shipments such as Federal Express or United Parcel Service did not begin until 1986.
        Sources: U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Transportation Energy Data Book, Edition 8, Table 1.5, Editions 11 and 14, Table 2.6, and unpublished 1985 data from ORNL.

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Figure 5.18. Change in the Freight Transportation Site Energy Consumption, by Freight Mode, 1985, 1988, and 1991

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          Notes: Percent change in domestic air freight transportation is not shown for 1985 to 1988. Since data collection for small package carriers such as Federal Express did not begin until 1986. In this graph, the share of oil pipeline in total freight consumption was less than 1 percent. Energy for moving water and natural gas is excluded.
        Sources: U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Transportation Energy Data Book, Edition 8, Table 1.5, Editions 11 and 14, Table 2.6, and unpublished 1985 data from ORNL.

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Figure 5.19. Domestic Freight Weight and Miles Traveled by Freight Mode, 1985, 1988, and 1991

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          Notes: Figure a: Air mode was 7, 9, 9-ton miles, respectively, for 1985, 1988, and 1991. Figure b: Air mode was 6, 8, 7-ton miles, respectively, for 1985, 1988, and 1991. Energy for moving water and natural gas is excluded. Marine ton miles include freight transported in rivers, canals, Great Lakes and oceans. Intercity freight ton miles only are included. Truck ton miles include both Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) and non-ICC trucks. Pipeline ton miles represent movement of crude oil and other petroleum products (excludes movement of water and natural gas). Air freight volumes include Federal Express or, United Parcel Service small package shipments only after 1985 since a data collection for small package shipments such as Federal Express or, UPS did not begin until 1986.
        Source: Eno Transportation Foundation, Inc., Transportation in America 1994, 12th Edition, pp and 46.

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Figure 5.20. Change in Ton Miles by Freight Mode, 1985, 1988, and 1991

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          Notes: In this graph, the share of oil pipeline in total freight consumption was less than 1 percent. Energy for moving water and natural gas is excluded. Data collection for small package shipments such as Federal Express or United Parcel Service did not begin until 1986.
          Source: Eno Transportation Foundation, Inc., Transportation in America 1994, 12th Edition, pp and 44.

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Figure 5.21. Energy-Intensity Indicator by Freight Mode, 1985, 1988, and 1991

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          Notes:The share of oil pipeline in total freight consumption was less than 1 percent. Energy for moving water and natural gas is excluded. Data collection for small package shipments such as Federal Express or United Parcel Service did not begin until 1986.
        Sources: U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Transportation Energy Data Book, Editions 11 and 14, Table 2.6 and unpublished 1985 data from ORNL.

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Figure 5.22. Change in the Energy-Intensity Indicator by Freight Mode, 1985, 1988, and 1991

 

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          Notes: In this graph, the share of oil pipeline in total freight consumption was less than 1 percent. Energy for moving water and natural gas is excluded. Data collection for small package shipments such as Federal Express or United Parcel Service did not begin until 1986.
          Sources: U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Transportation Energy Data Book, Edition 8, Table 1.5, Editions 11 and 14, Table 2.6 and unpublished 1985 data from ORNL. Eno Transportation Foundation, Inc., Transportation in America 1994, 12th Edition, pp. and 44.

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